Derrick Hall of the Arizona Diamondbacks is Honorary Chair of TGen’s 9th Annual StepNout Race Nov. 2

5K is expected to draw more than 1,000 participants to the Scottsdale Sports Complex, helping fund TGen’s pancreatic cancer research

Arizona Diamondbacks President and CEO Derrick Hall for the first time is the honorary chair of the 2014 stepNout Run Walk Dash, funding pancreatic cancer research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The 9th annual stepNout has a new location: the Scottsdale Sports Complex, northeast of Bell and Hayden roads. More participants are expected this year than ever before.

More than 1,000 people are expected to participate Nov. 2 in stepNout, which features fun, competitive races for all ages and abilities, including the event’s signature 5K run. Participants may register at the event. More information is available at www.tgenfoundation.org/step.

“Unfortunately, I lost my father to pancreatic cancer about three years ago,” Hall said. “It’s a terrible disease, and it’s usually not detected until it is in an advanced stage. By that point, there are few options. TGen is working on a method of early detection for pancreatic cancer, which this year will take the lives of nearly 40,000 Americans, the nation’s fourth-leading cause of cancer-related death.”

Erin Massey, Vice President of Development for Cancer Programs at the TGen Foundation, said: “Having an event chair like Derrick, who has been personally impacted by this disease, and who also understands TGen’s mission, provides an immediate connection to patients, their families and the thousands of concerned members of our community.”

TGen’s pancreatic cancer research is led by Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, TGen’s Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, and Chief Scientific Officer for the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, a partnership with TGen. Dr. Von Hoff is one of the world’s leading authorities on pancreatic cancer.

“If anyone is going to make a difference in treating this disease, and perhaps one day finding a cure, it is Dr. Daniel Von Hoff,” said Hall, who also is a member of TGen’s National Advisory Council for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

Vowing to “fight pancreatic cancer, one step at a time,” stepNout aims to surpass the $1 million mark in fundraising. Participants have donated more than $750,000 since the event started in 2006 at Kiwanis Park in Tempe.

Mattress Firm, the nation’s leading bedding retailer, announced in August that it had agreed to be the presenting sponsor of stepNout.

If you go to stepNout
What: TGen’s 9th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research.
Where: Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, northeast of Hayden and Bell roads, between Loop 101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.
When: 7-11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2.  Registration starts at 7 a.m.; races begin at 9 a.m.; an awards ceremony is set for 10 a.m.; and a kids’ dash is planned for 10:30 a.m.
Cost: Registration fees range from $15 to $35, depending on age and competition. Children ages 4 and under are free.
Registration: Register at the event.
Parking: Free.
More information: www.tgenfoundation.org/step.

About Mattress Firm
With more than 1,500 company-operated and franchised stores across 36 states, Mattress Firm (NASDAQ:MFRM) has the largest geographic footprint in the United States among multi-brand mattress retailers. Founded in 1986, Houston-based Mattress Firm is the nation’s leading bedding retailer with more than $1.2 billion in sales for 2013. The company offers a broad selection of both traditional and specialty mattresses, bedding accessories and other related products from leading manufacturers, including Sealy, Tempur-Pedic, Serta, Simmons, Stearns & Foster, Hampton & Rhodes and Atmos. Mattress Firm guarantees price, comfort and service with the ultimate goal of ensuring customers Save Money. Sleep Happy™. More information is available at mattressfirm.com.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

TGen and NAU Patent for New Pandemic Flu Test is Approved

H1N1 assay benefits patients by helping doctors determine if infections are resistant to available flu treatments

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.- The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU) for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain.

TGen and NAU initially developed this precise, genomics-based test during a significant global swine flu outbreak in 2009.

The newly-patented test, developed at TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division (TGen North) in Flagstaff, can not only detect influenza — as some tests do now — but also can quickly inform doctors about what strain of flu it is, and whether it is resistant to oseltamivir (sold by Roche under the brand name Tamiflu), the primary anti-viral drug on the market to treat H1N1.

As with other influenza strains, H1N1 flu can over time be expected to show signs of resistance to oseltamivir, and new treatments will be needed to respond to future pandemics.

“The problem with influenza is that it can become resistant to the antiviral drugs that are out there,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen North, a Regents Professor of Biology at NAU and one of the test’s inventors. “Because it is a virus, it easily mutates and becomes resistant.”

David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations for TGen North and another of the test’s inventors, said this flu detection and susceptibility test uses a molecular technique that rapidly makes exact copies of specific components of H1N1’s genetic material.

“Many people, including physicians, don’t realize that the pandemic swine flu strain from 2009 is still the most important flu strain out there. This assay is very effective with detecting and characterizing this dominant strain in the U.S. and around the world,” said Engelthaler, the former State Epidemiologist for Arizona, and former State of Arizona Biodefense Coordinator.

The third inventor of the test is TGen North Lab Manager Elizabeth Driebe.

Previously, only the U.S. Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) and a few select labs could look for resistance, using time-intensive technology.

“This new test puts the power in the hands of the clinician to determine if their drugs will work or not. This is really important moving forward as we discover new strains that are resistant to antivirals,” Engelthaler said.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified dozens of instances in which H1N1 was resistant to Tamiflu.

At most doctors’ offices, there is no readily available test for H1N1. Such tests generally are conducted by state and federal health agencies, and usually for those patients who require hospitalization and appear at high risk because they have a suppressed immune system or they have a chronic disease.

“Our test measures minute amounts of virus and minute changes to the virus. Not only does it detect when resistance is occurring, but it also detects it at the earliest onset possible,” Engelthaler said.

This new patent — No. US 8,808,993 B2, issued Aug. 19 by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office — could be licensed for development of test kits or for development of a testing service.

Earlier this year, TGen-NAU celebrated its first joint patent for a genomics-based test that can identify most of the world’s fungal infections that threaten human health.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

About Northern Arizona University
Northern Arizona University has a student population of more than 25,000 with its main campus at the foot of the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona.  NAU provides an outstanding undergraduate residential education strengthened by research, graduate and professional programs, and sophisticated methods of distance delivery and innovative new campuses and programs throughout the state.  NAU’s mission and goals are based on our core values, which includes placing learner needs at the center of our planning, policies, and programs; providing all qualified students with access to higher education; achieving multicultural understanding as a priority of educational and civic life; operating with fairness, honesty, and the highest ethical standards; and supporting a civil, engaging, and respectful campus climate.