See How Some People Are Honoring Zach’s Memory…

SprintingLife.com

Ryan Woods was diagnosed with Glioblastoma and told he had 1-4 months to live. He decided to let his story be heard. SoulPancake helped his voice be heard by the world. Share in his story… his love… and his inspiration. Take his story and allow it to inspire you to make a difference on this earth!

Ryan Woods passed away on Nov. 7, 2012. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife and children. Thank you for sharing your story with us, Ryan. We will miss you.

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American Brain Tumor Association Recognizes Awareness Month

PRWeb
Published 9:50 pm, Wednesday, May 1, 2013

 Bright Ideas campaign to spotlight the need for answers

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) May 01, 2013

The American Brain Tumor Association today announced the launch of its Bright Ideas campaign in recognition of Brain Tumor Awareness Month.

The American Brain Tumor Association, the first and now only national organization committed to providing both patient and caregiver support services and the funding of brain tumor research, is dedicated to providing and pursuing answers. The Bright Ideas concept reflects the organization’s role in fostering breakthroughs that lead to new thinking, better understanding and more effective treatments.

“When it comes to brain tumors we don’t know who, we don’t know when and perhaps most frustrating of all, we don’t know why,” said ABTA President and CEO Elizabeth M. Wilson. “Bright ideas, however, are what lead to breakthroughs—those ‘ah-ha!’ moments that bring us one step closer to finding the answers we seek. It is our hope that the Bright Ideas campaign will increase awareness of and support for breakthroughs in our understanding and treatment of brain tumors.”

Each day, 500 people in the United States will be diagnosed with a brain tumor. They join the nearly 700,000 who are currently living with the diagnosis. And in 2013, 13,000 people will lose their lives as a result of their brain tumor. There are more than 120 types of brain tumors, which means there is no one answer to the brain tumor challenge.

The campaign is designed to engage the ABTA’s social media followers in an effort to elevate the visibility of the disease and the organization among their networks and beyond through likes, shares and re-tweets of brain tumor facts, features and photos posted by the ABTA throughout May.

To participate in the Bright Ideas campaign, follow the ABTA on Twitter (@theABTA) and like the ABTA on Facebook at http:// facebook.com/theABTA. For more information on Bright Ideas activities throughout May, visit http://www.abta.org/get-involved/brain-tumor-awareness-month.html.

ABOUT THE AMERICAN BRAIN TUMOR ASSOCIATION
Founded in 1973, the American Brain Tumor Association was the first and is now the only national nonprofit brain tumor organization providing both support services to brain tumor patients and their families and funding of brain tumor research. For more information, visit http://www.abta.org.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/American-Brain-Tumor-Association-Recognizes-4480590.php#ixzz2SG02z3W4

Former NFL Coach Loses Battle To Brain Cancer

Chuck Fairbanks, ex-New England Patriots coach, 79

By Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY — Chuck Fairbanks, who spent six seasons as coach of the New England Patriots and coached Heisman Trophy winner Steve Owens at Oklahoma, died Tuesday in Arizona after battling brain cancer. He was 79. Oklahoma said in a news release that Fairbanks died in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale.

Colorado hired Fairbanks away from the Patriots, but he was just 7-26 in three seasons, including an 82-42 loss at home to the Sooners and his replacement, Barry Switzer. He won 46 games for New England, a franchise record at the time. The Patriots made the playoffs in their fourth season under Fairbanks in 1976 and two years later were on their way to their first outright AFC East title when owner Billy Sullivan angrily suspended him for the final regular-season game because he had agreed to go to Colorado. Fairbanks returned for the playoffs, but New England lost to Houston. He was 0-2 in the playoffs with New England.

Fairbanks left the Buffs to become coach and general manager of the New Jersey Generals of the USFL. He was fired after one season.

Fairbanks was 52-15-1 in six years with the Sooners, including an Orange Bowl victory his first season and consecutive Sugar Bowls wins in 1971-72 before taking over the Patriots.

The Sooners went 10-1 and beat Tennessee in the Orange Bowl in Fairbanks’ first year in 1967. He won 11 games each of last two seasons with OU, beating Auburn and Penn State in the Sugar Bowl.

“His squads won three Big Eight championships and helped lay the foundation for the program’s ongoing success with the installation of the wishbone-T offense,” current Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops said in a statement.

Fairbanks worked in real estate and golf-course development after his coaching career. He occasionally worked as a consultant for NFL teams in training camp, including with the Dallas Cowboys when Bill Parcells was coach.

 

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000156947/article/chuck-fairbanks-exnew-england-patriots-coach-79

Mother Honors Son Lost to Brain Cancer

Nonprofit raises $200,000-plus for brain cancer research

Photo submitted by CINDY VILLARREAL

Nick’s brother, Marcus Gonzales (left), participates in the golf tournament fundraiser with friends each year.

When Cindy Villarreal’s 29-year-old son lost his battle to brain cancer in 2006, she knew she had two choices. She could wallow in grief or channel her emotions into something positive.

She chose the latter.

“It has helped me to heal knowing I’m doing something in his memory,” Villarreal said

Harnessing the Power of Fluorescent Light

Fluorescent Tracer ‘Lights Up’ Brain Tumor for Surgery

A bright pink glow showed the precise pathway a glioma took to spread through the brain

By Barbara Bronson Gray
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) — Neurosurgeons report that they harnessed the power of fluorescent light to illuminate a brain tumor so the entire growth could be removed.

A report describes a case in which a patient with glioblastoma swallowed a pill, called 5-ALA, and was taken to surgery about four hours later. The medication attached itself to tumor cells, causing them to glow brightly. Once the skull was opened, the doctors focused a blue light on the tumor, which gave the cancerous cells a pink glow, so the surgeons could differentiate malignant tissue from healthy tissue.

“This is a very, very good thing,” said study author Mitchel Berger, chairman of neurosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco. “In this case, we just happened to notice we could see evidence of the tumor spreading along the way of the ventricles [a communicating network of brain cavities], which showed we could see tumor dissemination.”

The authors noted that the best way to extend survival is to remove as much of the brain tumor as possible. The research is published in the Feb. 19 issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

It’s not always easy to see precisely where a tumor has spread in the brain. Some types of tumors can be particularly difficult to identify and remove, even with the benefit of MRI and surgical microscopes.

The use of fluorescence appears to be more effective than MRI technology, at least in this case, because the glow allows surgeons to see microscopic remnants of the tumor and areas of the cancer that might be mistaken for edema, or swelling, Berger explained. “This is an inexpensive way to identify high-grade tumors,” he said.

Glioblastomas are a fast-growing type of tumor that usually occurs in adults and affects the brain more often than the spinal cord, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Why do tumor cells respond differently to the fluorescent drug than the body’s other cells do? Their metabolism involves porphyrin, which has a tremendous ability to absorb light, Berger explained. Porphyrin is an organic compound, like the pigment in red blood cells. The pill used in the case report is derived from porphyrin.

The report focused on the case of a 56-year-old man who had undergone resection of a glioblastoma located in the right occipital lobe of his brain in 2005. Several years later, when symptoms reappeared, an MRI scan showed three distinct, new sites of tumor in the patient’s right temporal lobe.

In surgery, when the surgeons viewed the fluorescent tumor cells, they could tell rather than being a new tumor, the cancer had spread from its original location on the right side of the brain through a pathway along the wall of the right ventricle. The researchers found that the use of 5-ALA during surgery enabled them to see the actual pathway of the tumor as it had spread.

The use of 5-ALA changed the patient’s prognosis. “Multi-centric disease worsens the prognosis,” Berger explained.

While the technique has been used in Europe for several years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved the use of 5-ALA in the United States. Any surgeons using 5-ALA do so with limited permission from the FDA, Berger noted. The medication, 5-ALA, is manufactured by DUSA Pharmaceuticals.

Dr. Michael Schulder, vice chairman of the department of neurosurgery at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y., explained that “while the FDA considers 5-ALA a drug, which would require a lengthy process for approval, neurosurgeons see it as a surgical aid, which would take far less time to get the OK.”

While Schulder said he thinks 5-ALA probably will add about six months to the anticipated survival of patients with high-grade gliomas, he said that attempts to improve the ability to remove these tumors will only go so far. “In the end, however helpful the use of 5-ALA or similar compounds may be in the surgical removal of brain cancers, it won’t be the answer. The treatments will have to be biological to truly have an impact on survival, and ultimately, on a cure.”

Schulder said he thinks it would be possible for fluorescence to be used in other types of surgeries, if surgeons could become comfortable using a surgical microscope with the benefit of a special light (something neurosurgeons are accustomed to using). He noted that he also thinks the technique might apply to some spinal surgeries, where visualizing the spinal cord is critical.

 

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2013/02/19/fluorescent-tracer-lights-up-brain-tumor-for-surgery