U.S. issues patent for Valley Fever detection technology developed by TGen and NAU

Test for dust-borne fungal infection created by TGen and NAU is licensed to DxNA 

PHOENIX, Ariz. — Aug. 2, 2016 — Valley Fever, a potentially deadly dust-borne fungal disease, should be easier to diagnose and treat thanks to a testing technology developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU), and now protected by a patent issued today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

TGen and NAU have exclusively licensed this technology to DxNA LLC, a company based in St. George, Utah, which plans to make this Valley Fever Test commercially available to hospitals and clinics upon completion of FDA clinical trials and a subsequent FDA 510(k) submission for review and clearance later this year.

Valley Fever is endemic to Phoenix and Tucson, but also is spreading throughout the arid regions of North and South America. It is an infection caused by the microscopic fungus Coccidioides, a pathogen that lives in desert soils and typically enters the body through the lungs. An estimated 150,000 Americans are infected annually by Valley Fever, and as many as 500 die each year.

“Currently, there is no definitive test for Valley Fever. Our new rapid, 1-hour, genetic-based test will provide physicians and patients with a precise diagnosis, enabling prompt treatment and preventing this disease from becoming more serious,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division, or TGen North, based in Flagstaff.

“For the past decade, TGen has worked to develop better tools and technology to address Valley Fever, and we think it is critical to be able to apply our cutting-edge science to problems in our own backyard,” said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, and Director of NAU’s Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen).

Valley Fever most commonly causes a progressive lung infection, but can also spread to other parts of the body, including the skin, bone, brain and the rest of the nervous system.

Nearly 60 percent of those infected by Valley Fever — including other vertebrates, and especially dogs — develop no significant symptoms. However, some patients develop highly debilitating symptoms, such as cough, fever and fatigue. These symptoms are similar to other respiratory diseases caused by bacteria or virus, and often lead to delayed diagnoses and inappropriate treatment. Very severe Valley Fever can require lifelong treatment with antifungal drugs, and even result in death.

This new genetic-based test can precisely identify both strains of Valley Fever: Coccidioides posadasii, found in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and much of Latin America, and Coccidioides immitus, which is found in California, Washington and Baja Mexico.

Most infections occur in central and southern Arizona. Each year on average, there are an estimated 150,000 cases in Arizona, resulting in more than 1,700 hospitalizations at a cost of more than $86 million.

“These high costs are driven to a significant degree by the high level of misdiagnosis, resulting in an average time to diagnosis of 5 months from when a patient first seeks care,” said David Taus, CEO of DxNA LLC. “Our test provides definitive results in 60 minutes, dramatically improving the diagnosis of the disease over current methodologies, both in terms of time and accuracy.”

The intellectual property used in DxNA’s Valley Fever Test is exclusive to DxNA LLC, and covers both human and veterinary applications, Taus said.

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Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton Proclaims Nov. 26 as TGen ‘Get Your Jersey On’ Day

ASU-UA rivalry football game is focus of fundraising for groundbreaking TGen-led concussion study

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton today proclaimed Wednesday, Nov. 26, as TGen “Get Your Jersey On” Day in support of a groundbreaking sports concussion study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

In anticipation of Arizona’s biggest rivalry football game of the year, TGen invites businesses, schools and other organizations throughout the state to join TGen’s “Get Your Jersey On” campaign, and allow their employees to wear their favorite sports jersey or t-shirt to work or school on Wednesday, Nov. 26 — the day before Thanksgiving.

The day was selected in anticipation of the 88th Duel in the Desert, pitting the Arizona State University Sun Devils against the University of Arizona Wildcats onNov. 28 in Tucson, which could decide which team (both with records of 9-2) goes to the PAC-12 Championship.

Among those already participating Nov. 26 in Get Your Jersey On day are the Phoenix and Tucson offices of CBRE, a nationwide commercial real estate firm, and HealthSouth Scottsdale Rehabilitation Hospital.

TGen encourages participants to make small donations of $10 towards TGen’s groundbreaking concussion research, which consists of ASU student-athletes voluntarily wearing sensors in their helmets to measure the number, location, duration, direction and force of impacts during practices and games.

These measurements, combined with biological tests, could result in the discovery of a biomarker — a measurable change in the athlete’s genetic makeup — that would objectively indicate when a player is too hurt to take the field, or when they are fit enough to re-enter the game.

TGen’s multi-year study is in conjunction with Riddell — the industry leader in football helmet technology and innovation — Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. The study could help protect the health of student athletes by replacing subjective examinations players currently undergo on the sidelines after a serious hit with a definitive genomics-based test.

Hundreds of Chandler’s Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School students and teachers and Arizona employees of Bank of America Merrill Lynch already have participated in Get Your Jersey On events earlier this fall. Additional Get Your Jersey On events are anticipated surrounding the inaugural NCAA college football playoffs in late December and early January, as well as the Jan. 25 NFL Pro Bowl and Feb. 1Super Bowl, both being played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.

Mayor Stanton’s proclamation reads, in part:

“The schools (ASU and UA) have amassed a significant presence in downtown Phoenix, providing new educational opportunities and driving creativity, culture, business development and jobs. TGen is encouraging all alumni to wear their maroon and gold or red and blue in support of the research — and the fun nature of the rivalry.

“Participating organizations are not only showing team spirit — they’re also contributing to TGen’s concussion research with small donations.

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, GREG STANTON, Mayor of the City of Phoenix, Arizona, do hereby proclaim November 26, 2014, as TGEN “GET YOUR JERSEY ON” DAY and ask each resident on this twenty-sixth day of November, in the year two thousand fourteen to wear their favorite sports jerseys to help raise awareness and funds for TGen’s ongoing concussion research.”

Dean Ballard, TGen Foundation Assistant Director of Development, said: “TGen is thrilled that Mayor Stanton has issued this proclamation. He is helping us shine a bright light on this important research. We welcome additional businesses and organizations across Arizona to Get Their Jersey On in support of this study, which will help protect athletes in any sport now, and in the future.”

If you would like your organization to participate in Get Your Jersey On, contact Ballard at dballard@tgen.org, or 602-343-8543.

ASU and UA annually vie for the coveted Territorial Cup, the nation’s oldest rivalry trophy in college football. It dates to 1899 — 13 years before Arizona became a state — when Arizona’s two largest institutions of higher learning first met on the gridiron. The Wildcats lead the series 47-39, with one tie.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

 

ASU-UA Rivalry Football Game is Focus of Fundraising for Groundbreaking TGen-Led Concussion Study

‘Get Your Jersey On’ encourages businesses and organizations to wear their favorite sports jersey to work or school, supporting TGen’s investigations

In anticipation of Arizona’s biggest rivalry football game of the year, the Translational Genomics Research Institute invites businesses, schools and other organizations throughout the state to join TGen’s “Get Your Jersey On” campaign for concussion research.

TGen encourages organizations to allow their employees to wear their favorite sports jersey or t-shirt to work or school on Nov. 26 — the day before Thanksgiving — in anticipation of the 88th Duel in the Desert, pitting the Arizona State University Sun Devils against the University of Arizona Wildcats on Nov. 28 in Tucson.

TGen encourages participants to make small donations of $10 towards TGen’s groundbreaking concussion research, which consists of ASU student-athletes voluntarily wearing sensors in their helmets to measure the number, location, duration, direction and force of impacts during practices and games.

These measurements, combined with biological tests, could result in the discovery of a biomarker — a measurable change in the athlete’s genetic makeup — that would objectively indicate when a player is too hurt to take the field, or when they are fit enough to re-enter the game.

TGen’s multi-year study is in conjunction with Riddell — the industry leader in football helmet technology and innovation — Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. The study could help protect the health of student athletes by replacing subjective examinations players currently undergo on the sidelines after a serious hit with a definitive genomics-based test.

Hundreds of Chandler’s Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School students and teachers and Arizona employees of Bank of America Merrill Lynch already have participated in Get Your Jersey On events earlier this fall. Other Get Your Jersey On events are anticipated surrounding the inaugural NCAA college football playoffs in late December and early January, as well as the Jan. 25 NFL Pro Bowl and Feb. 1Super Bowl, both being played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.

“It is our hope that the enthusiasm sports fans have for the ASU-UA rivalry game will translate into support for this vitally important TGen-led study of concussions,” said Dean Ballard, TGen Foundation Assistant Director of Development. “We welcome additional businesses and organizations to Get Their Jersey On and turn their love of sports into a way to help protect the athletes they admire.”

If you would like your organization to participate in Get Your Jersey On, contact Ballard at dballard@tgen.org, or 602-343-8543.

ASU (8-2) and UA (8-2) annually vie for the coveted Territorial Cup, the nation’s oldest rivalry trophy in college football. It dates to 1899 — 13 years before Arizona became a state — when Arizona’s two largest institutions of higher learning first met on the gridiron. The Wildcats lead the series 47-39, with one tie.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

 

TGen and NAU Patent for New Pandemic Flu Test is Approved

H1N1 assay benefits patients by helping doctors determine if infections are resistant to available flu treatments

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.- The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU) for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain.

TGen and NAU initially developed this precise, genomics-based test during a significant global swine flu outbreak in 2009.

The newly-patented test, developed at TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division (TGen North) in Flagstaff, can not only detect influenza — as some tests do now — but also can quickly inform doctors about what strain of flu it is, and whether it is resistant to oseltamivir (sold by Roche under the brand name Tamiflu), the primary anti-viral drug on the market to treat H1N1.

As with other influenza strains, H1N1 flu can over time be expected to show signs of resistance to oseltamivir, and new treatments will be needed to respond to future pandemics.

“The problem with influenza is that it can become resistant to the antiviral drugs that are out there,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen North, a Regents Professor of Biology at NAU and one of the test’s inventors. “Because it is a virus, it easily mutates and becomes resistant.”

David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations for TGen North and another of the test’s inventors, said this flu detection and susceptibility test uses a molecular technique that rapidly makes exact copies of specific components of H1N1’s genetic material.

“Many people, including physicians, don’t realize that the pandemic swine flu strain from 2009 is still the most important flu strain out there. This assay is very effective with detecting and characterizing this dominant strain in the U.S. and around the world,” said Engelthaler, the former State Epidemiologist for Arizona, and former State of Arizona Biodefense Coordinator.

The third inventor of the test is TGen North Lab Manager Elizabeth Driebe.

Previously, only the U.S. Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) and a few select labs could look for resistance, using time-intensive technology.

“This new test puts the power in the hands of the clinician to determine if their drugs will work or not. This is really important moving forward as we discover new strains that are resistant to antivirals,” Engelthaler said.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified dozens of instances in which H1N1 was resistant to Tamiflu.

At most doctors’ offices, there is no readily available test for H1N1. Such tests generally are conducted by state and federal health agencies, and usually for those patients who require hospitalization and appear at high risk because they have a suppressed immune system or they have a chronic disease.

“Our test measures minute amounts of virus and minute changes to the virus. Not only does it detect when resistance is occurring, but it also detects it at the earliest onset possible,” Engelthaler said.

This new patent — No. US 8,808,993 B2, issued Aug. 19 by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office — could be licensed for development of test kits or for development of a testing service.

Earlier this year, TGen-NAU celebrated its first joint patent for a genomics-based test that can identify most of the world’s fungal infections that threaten human health.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

About Northern Arizona University
Northern Arizona University has a student population of more than 25,000 with its main campus at the foot of the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona.  NAU provides an outstanding undergraduate residential education strengthened by research, graduate and professional programs, and sophisticated methods of distance delivery and innovative new campuses and programs throughout the state.  NAU’s mission and goals are based on our core values, which includes placing learner needs at the center of our planning, policies, and programs; providing all qualified students with access to higher education; achieving multicultural understanding as a priority of educational and civic life; operating with fairness, honesty, and the highest ethical standards; and supporting a civil, engaging, and respectful campus climate.

Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk

LAUNCHES INAUGURAL 5K RUN & WALK EVENT TO RECOGNIZE ALL CLINICAL TRIAL VOLUNTEERS

Partnership with DIA to Honor People Who Give the Gift of Participation in Clinical Research

BOSTON, MA – March 1, 2014 — The Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP), an independent non-profit, is excited to announce the launch of a new event — Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk in San Diego — to celebrate the volunteers who give the gift of participation in clinical research. The first annual Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk will coincide with the Drug Information Association (DIA) 2014 Annual Meeting. The event will take place on Monday, June 16, 2014 outside the San Diego Convention Center from 6:45-8:00am. Participants are encouraged to register early as space is limited. To register, visit ciscrp.org/med-hero-5k.

“Medical Heroes are the millions of people who help advance public health and medical knowledge by taking part in clinical trials each year,” said CISCRP’s founder, Ken Getz. “This special event recognizes their gift, raises public awareness and appreciation, and hopefully will become an annual tradition.”

Running and walking enthusiasts and all supporters of CISCRP’s mission are invited to participate or attend the event to show their support. Proceeds from the event will support education and outreach programs to patients and families interested in learning more about the clinical research process.

“We are honored the inaugural offering of the Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K will be held during the 50th Anniversary of DIA’s Annual Meeting.” said Lori Risboskin, DIA’s Associate Director Event Planning & Exhibits. “DIA members understand the importance of clinical research volunteers and appreciate their participation in clinical trials. We’re delighted to help CISCRP launch this special event.”

Registrants will have the opportunity to check-in early on Sunday June 15, 2014 from 8am – 9am, 12pm – 1pm, and 3pm – 6pm to receive event materials and giveaways. Regular check-in the day of the event begins at 6am; and the 5K Run & Walk will begin at 6:45am. For more information about the event, to volunteer, register or become a sponsor, visit ciscrp.org/med-hero-5k. Questions about event registration should go to Ellyn Getz (617) 725-2750, e-mail medhero5k@ciscrp.org, or call toll free 1-877-MED-HERO.

About CISCRP

CISCRP is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to engaging the public and patients as partners in the clinical research process. CISCRP provides free education and outreach to the general public and patient communities. Visit www.CISCRP.org for more information or to support CISCRP.

About the DIA 2014 50th Annual Meeting

The DIA Annual Meeting is the premier event for professionals involved in the discovery, development and lifecycle management of pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices and related medical products. No other industry event rivals the depth and breadth of experience that this meeting delivers through 20 interest-area tracks, 260+ program offerings and 18 pre-conference tutorials. The presentations are geared to attendees of all disciplines and experience levels. Visit our website at www.diahome.org and follow DIA at: LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, and Pinterest.

https://www.ciscrp.org/programs-events/events/annual-medical-heroes-appreciation-5k/

 

 

Congratulations to TGen’s Dr. Bodour Salhia

TGen’s Dr. Bodour Salhia named to 2014 Class of 40 Under 40

Newspaper recognizes TGen cancer researcher among Phoenix’s brightest young leaders

PHOENIX, Ariz. — May 6, 2014 — Dr. Bodour Salhia, a cancer researcher at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has been named one of the Phoenix Business Journal’s 2014 Class of 40 Under 40.

Dr. Salhia, an Assistant Professor in TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, will be among the 40 up-and-coming Phoenix leaders — less than 40 years of age — at an awards reception June 19 at Phoenix Theater.

In his award notification letter to Dr. Salhia, PBJ Publisher Don Henninger said, “I speak for all the judges in saying that we feel honored to have seen a glimpse of your life and career. You are most certainly a valuable member of our community and a source of inspiration for all.”

All 40 Under 40 classmates will be featured in a special section of the June 20 edition of the PBJ.

“Bodour is a gem; brilliant and transparent. She is an incredible asset to TGen and to the state of Arizona. Watching her growth and career ascent has been one of the highlights of my entire career,” said Dr. John Carpten, TGen Deputy Director of Basic Science.

“She is an amazing scientist, but also frequently participates in patient advocacy and community education,” said Dr. Carpten, also Professor and Director of TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division. “We are so proud of Bodour. To me, this is not simply a recognition of her achievements, but also a reward for all that she does for others.”

Dr. Salhia, who specializes in researching breast cancer and multiple myeloma, is the fourth TGen staff member in three years to be selected to PBJ’s 40 Under 40. Dr. Matt Huentelman, an Associate Professor in TGen’s Neurogenomics Division, and Dr. Glen Weiss, a Clinical Associate Professor in TGen’s Cancer and Cell Biology Division, were named in 2013. Dr. Candice Nulsen, TGen’s former Director of Education and Community Outreach, was selected in 2012.

“I am so thankful and humbled to be selected among this year’s 40 Under 40 by the Phoenix Business Journal,” said Dr. Salhia, whose community work has included outreach to cancer patients of the Navajo Nation, and service as a board member of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Central and Northern Arizona Affiliate. “This award is not just about me, but also reflects all the cutting-edge research that TGen conducts, using the human genome to devise better treatments for patients today.”

The 40 Under 40 program’s hundreds of alumni includes Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, a member of the TGen Board of Directors, and Arizona Diamondbacks President Derrick Hall, a member of TGen’s National Advisory Council for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

About TGen

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

 

 

Learn About Brain Cancer

Brain Cancer

A disease of the brain in which cancer cells (malignant) arise in the brain tissue. Cancer cells grow to form a mass of cancer tissue (tumor) that interferes with brain functions such as muscle control, sensation, memory, and other normal body functions.

Brain Tumor

An abnormal growth of tissue in the brain.  Unlike other tumors, brain tumors spread by local extension and rarely metastasize (spread) outside the brain.

Clinical Trials

Research studies done to determine whether new drugs, treatments, or vaccines are safe and effective.  They are conducted in three phases:

  • Phase I
    In this phase, small groups of people are treated with a certain dose of a new agent that has been extensively studied in the laboratory. During the trial, the dose is increased group by group to find the highest dose that does not cause harmful side effects. Usually there is no control treatment for comparison. This process determines a safe, appropriate dose for use in Phase II.
  • Phase II
    This phase provides continued safety testing of a new agent, along with an evaluation of how well it works against a specific type of cancer. The new agent is given to groups of people and is usually compared with a standard treatment.
  • Phase III
    This phase answers research questions across the disease continuum and includes large numbers of participants so that the differences in effectiveness of the new agent can be evaluated. If the results of this phase merit further use of the new agent, the pharmaceutical company will usually submit a New Drug Application to the FDA.

Diagnostics

The determination of the nature of a disease or ailment.  A clinical diagnosis is based on the medical history and physical examination of the patient.

Glial Cells

Cells that provide structure to the central nervous system and insulate and protect neurons (cells that transmit electrical impulses that allow seeing/hearing/smelling/tasting).

Glioma

The term used to refer to the most prevalent primary brain tumors.  Gliomas arise from glial tissue, which supports and nourishes cells that send messages from the brain to other parts of the body.

Glioblastoma

Also known as glioblastoma multiforme, this is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, involving glial cells and accounting for 52 percent of all functional tissue brain tumor cases and 20 percent of all intracranial tumors.

GBM

GBM is an abbreviation for glioblastoma multiforme.

Translational Genomics

Innovative advances arising from the Human Genome Project, applying them to the development of diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases

Ivy Foundation Helps Transform Healthcare

Ivy Foundation Biomedical Innovation Fund Doubles Support for U.Va. Projects Benefiting Human Health

New commitments from the Ivy Foundation and the University of Virginia School of Medicine will double the annual Ivy Biomedical Innovation Fund’s research awards for U.Va. faculty, while advancing discoveries to better diagnose and treat disease.

The Ivy Foundation Biomedical Innovation fund supports projects that involve School of Medicine faculty members and other investigators from multiple departments, schools and specialties across the University.

Since the creation of the Ivy Biomedical Innovation Fund in 2008, the Ivy Foundation has awarded $860,000 to University research collaborations that have the potential to yield leading-edge diagnostics, technology and treatments for a wide range of human health problems.

Each year, the fund awards approximately $200,000, with individual awards averaging $50,000. Beginning in 2013, the Ivy Foundation will increase its annual contribution, which will be matched by the School of Medicine to provide awards totaling $500,000 annually.

“The scope of projects funded over the past five years has been impressive,” said Dr. Robert W. Battle, who chairs the Ivy Foundation and directs U.Va.’s Adult Congenital Heart Clinic. “This research will make a real and immediate difference for patients. It’s gratifying to see the work that has been accomplished through the Ivy Foundation’s support. I look forward to seeing the impact that these added resources will make possible.”

In 2012, a record number of U.Va. researchers and clinicians applied for funding, with 28 proposals coming from U.Va.’s College of Arts & Sciences, School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Medicine, School of Nursingand Medical Center.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1gQalnU

Ivy Foundation Funds Society of St. Vincent de Paul Diabetes Program

Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2013 3:45 am

http://bit.ly/1gQaibq

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation (Ivy Foundation) announced its funding of the Family Wellness Program managed by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Phoenix.

The Ivy Foundation is the largest privately funded brain cancer research foundation in North America; Catherine Ivy is the founder and president of the Ivy Foundation.

The Family Wellness Program is a culturally responsive diabetes intervention program that provides education, lifestyle improvement skills, medical, and counseling services to adults, children, and their families who have been diagnosed with diabetes and pre-diabetes and its associated comorbidities (two or more medical conditions present simultaneously in a patient).

The overall goal is to empower these families with the knowledge, tools and skills to make health a priority throughout their lives.

37 Cancer Fighting Foods & Drinks

37 Cancer Fighting Foods & Drinks

Cancer is one of the most feared diseases, and there are so many different forms that it can feel overwhelming to try to prevent them all. If you’ve already been diagnosed as having cancer, it becomes crucial to make sure that your body is getting the nutrients it needs to help battle it back and support the body during treatment. Here are dozens of foods that have each shown to be beneficial in the fight against cancer, and preventing it from happening in the first place.

red wine fights cancer

Red Wine

There is a chemical specifically in red wine that shows promise for being a cancer fighter. It’s called resveratrol and you may have heard of it, as it has been popping up not just in red wine, but on supplement claiming to contain it. For years doctors have been recommending a glass of red wine per day for heart health. Only recently has it been discovered that there may be anti-cancer benefits. Many pills out there claim to have far more resveratrol in them than red wine has, but be sure to check the facts first.

green tea

Green Tea

Green tea is full of antioxidants, more so than other teas because it doesn’t undergo as much processing, leaving all of these important cancer fighting minerals intact. It’s worth the time and effort to incorporate this into your diet because it doesn’t just help prevent certain cancers from forming, it can help battle them back if you’ve already got them. The good news is that it’s not just one or two studies that have confirmed this, and it has also withstood the test of time and been verified on repeated tests. It’s a bonafide ally against cancer and also provides plenty of additional benefits.

ginger

Ginger

You’ll never look at this simple root the same way again once you hear how it’s able to help you on your quest to stay battle back cancer. It actually gets cancer cells to kill themselves. Pretty powerful, huh? It also has anti-inflammatory properties, so it’s working to help with cancer in two distinct ways. Scientists are even hopeful that it can help with some of the harder-to fight cancers as well. The other great feature is that it can add some delicious flavor to a meal, so it’s not very hard to start getting more of it.

turmeric

Turmeric

This superspice even gets props from the American Cancer Society for its antioxidant value. They do state that it’s too early to tell if research being conducted on it proves that these antioxidants provide anti-inflammatory benefits. But time and time again it seems that ages old wisdom gets proven right, and this is a spice that has been used for hundreds of years for its healing benefits. With all that we know about antioxidants and the way they help prevent and also assist in eradicating cancer, it’s easy enough to start using it now.

beans

Beans

It seems that you can’t go wrong when choosing your beans. Whether they’re white beans which Dr. Oz recommends, or navy or black beans, the research shows that they’re able to provide plenty of fiber and fatty acids that help provide protection against cancer growth, before it starts or helping to prevent its spread. You don’t have to go all out and start eating beans at every meal in order to reap the benefits. You simply start adding roughly half a cup just a couple of times a week and you’ll be covered.

dark chocolate

Dark Chocolate

The antioxidants in dark chocolate have only recently made the news as being a healthy thing to have in your diet. For years it was thought that chocolate only made you fat and was a form of sweet that was bad for your health. This is still true for milk chocolate, and the healthy benefits only apply to dark chocolate. The less processed chocolate you can find, the better, as many companies like to tinker with it, it can be hard to find it in an untouched form. Look for pure and organic dark chocolate, and satisfy your craving without going overboard.

Read more: http://bembu.com/cancer-fighting-foods