Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton Proclaims Nov. 26 as TGen ‘Get Your Jersey On’ Day

ASU-UA rivalry football game is focus of fundraising for groundbreaking TGen-led concussion study

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton today proclaimed Wednesday, Nov. 26, as TGen “Get Your Jersey On” Day in support of a groundbreaking sports concussion study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

In anticipation of Arizona’s biggest rivalry football game of the year, TGen invites businesses, schools and other organizations throughout the state to join TGen’s “Get Your Jersey On” campaign, and allow their employees to wear their favorite sports jersey or t-shirt to work or school on Wednesday, Nov. 26 — the day before Thanksgiving.

The day was selected in anticipation of the 88th Duel in the Desert, pitting the Arizona State University Sun Devils against the University of Arizona Wildcats onNov. 28 in Tucson, which could decide which team (both with records of 9-2) goes to the PAC-12 Championship.

Among those already participating Nov. 26 in Get Your Jersey On day are the Phoenix and Tucson offices of CBRE, a nationwide commercial real estate firm, and HealthSouth Scottsdale Rehabilitation Hospital.

TGen encourages participants to make small donations of $10 towards TGen’s groundbreaking concussion research, which consists of ASU student-athletes voluntarily wearing sensors in their helmets to measure the number, location, duration, direction and force of impacts during practices and games.

These measurements, combined with biological tests, could result in the discovery of a biomarker — a measurable change in the athlete’s genetic makeup — that would objectively indicate when a player is too hurt to take the field, or when they are fit enough to re-enter the game.

TGen’s multi-year study is in conjunction with Riddell — the industry leader in football helmet technology and innovation — Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. The study could help protect the health of student athletes by replacing subjective examinations players currently undergo on the sidelines after a serious hit with a definitive genomics-based test.

Hundreds of Chandler’s Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School students and teachers and Arizona employees of Bank of America Merrill Lynch already have participated in Get Your Jersey On events earlier this fall. Additional Get Your Jersey On events are anticipated surrounding the inaugural NCAA college football playoffs in late December and early January, as well as the Jan. 25 NFL Pro Bowl and Feb. 1Super Bowl, both being played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.

Mayor Stanton’s proclamation reads, in part:

“The schools (ASU and UA) have amassed a significant presence in downtown Phoenix, providing new educational opportunities and driving creativity, culture, business development and jobs. TGen is encouraging all alumni to wear their maroon and gold or red and blue in support of the research — and the fun nature of the rivalry.

“Participating organizations are not only showing team spirit — they’re also contributing to TGen’s concussion research with small donations.

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, GREG STANTON, Mayor of the City of Phoenix, Arizona, do hereby proclaim November 26, 2014, as TGEN “GET YOUR JERSEY ON” DAY and ask each resident on this twenty-sixth day of November, in the year two thousand fourteen to wear their favorite sports jerseys to help raise awareness and funds for TGen’s ongoing concussion research.”

Dean Ballard, TGen Foundation Assistant Director of Development, said: “TGen is thrilled that Mayor Stanton has issued this proclamation. He is helping us shine a bright light on this important research. We welcome additional businesses and organizations across Arizona to Get Their Jersey On in support of this study, which will help protect athletes in any sport now, and in the future.”

If you would like your organization to participate in Get Your Jersey On, contact Ballard at dballard@tgen.org, or 602-343-8543.

ASU and UA annually vie for the coveted Territorial Cup, the nation’s oldest rivalry trophy in college football. It dates to 1899 — 13 years before Arizona became a state — when Arizona’s two largest institutions of higher learning first met on the gridiron. The Wildcats lead the series 47-39, with one tie.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

 

ASU-UA Rivalry Football Game is Focus of Fundraising for Groundbreaking TGen-Led Concussion Study

‘Get Your Jersey On’ encourages businesses and organizations to wear their favorite sports jersey to work or school, supporting TGen’s investigations

In anticipation of Arizona’s biggest rivalry football game of the year, the Translational Genomics Research Institute invites businesses, schools and other organizations throughout the state to join TGen’s “Get Your Jersey On” campaign for concussion research.

TGen encourages organizations to allow their employees to wear their favorite sports jersey or t-shirt to work or school on Nov. 26 — the day before Thanksgiving — in anticipation of the 88th Duel in the Desert, pitting the Arizona State University Sun Devils against the University of Arizona Wildcats on Nov. 28 in Tucson.

TGen encourages participants to make small donations of $10 towards TGen’s groundbreaking concussion research, which consists of ASU student-athletes voluntarily wearing sensors in their helmets to measure the number, location, duration, direction and force of impacts during practices and games.

These measurements, combined with biological tests, could result in the discovery of a biomarker — a measurable change in the athlete’s genetic makeup — that would objectively indicate when a player is too hurt to take the field, or when they are fit enough to re-enter the game.

TGen’s multi-year study is in conjunction with Riddell — the industry leader in football helmet technology and innovation — Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. The study could help protect the health of student athletes by replacing subjective examinations players currently undergo on the sidelines after a serious hit with a definitive genomics-based test.

Hundreds of Chandler’s Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School students and teachers and Arizona employees of Bank of America Merrill Lynch already have participated in Get Your Jersey On events earlier this fall. Other Get Your Jersey On events are anticipated surrounding the inaugural NCAA college football playoffs in late December and early January, as well as the Jan. 25 NFL Pro Bowl and Feb. 1Super Bowl, both being played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.

“It is our hope that the enthusiasm sports fans have for the ASU-UA rivalry game will translate into support for this vitally important TGen-led study of concussions,” said Dean Ballard, TGen Foundation Assistant Director of Development. “We welcome additional businesses and organizations to Get Their Jersey On and turn their love of sports into a way to help protect the athletes they admire.”

If you would like your organization to participate in Get Your Jersey On, contact Ballard at dballard@tgen.org, or 602-343-8543.

ASU (8-2) and UA (8-2) annually vie for the coveted Territorial Cup, the nation’s oldest rivalry trophy in college football. It dates to 1899 — 13 years before Arizona became a state — when Arizona’s two largest institutions of higher learning first met on the gridiron. The Wildcats lead the series 47-39, with one tie.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

 

TGen’s Dr. John Carpten Honored with AACR Distinguished Lectureship on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities

NIH director praises choice of Dr. Carpten to give award lecture on medically underserved and underrepresented at AACR conference Nov. 9

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the world’s largest cancer research organization representing more than 35,000 investigators, congratulates Dr. John D. Carpten on receiving the 2014 AACR Distinguished Lectureship on the Science of Health Disparities, funded by Susan G. Komen.

He will be honored at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Nov. 9-12 in San Antonio.

Dr. Francis S. Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), praised the selection of Dr. Carpten: “As NIH Director, this is a double delight — seeing health disparities research get the recognition it deserves, and seeing John Carpten, who I had the privilege of co-mentoring at NIH almost two decades ago, receiving this award. Bravo to John and the AACR.”

Dr. Carpten, Deputy Director of Basic Sciences at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, is being recognized for his outstanding research focused on understanding the role of biology in the disparate cancer incidence and mortality rates seen among minority populations.

He will deliver his award lecture, “Genetics and Genome Sciences in Cancer Health Disparities,” during the opening plenary session, 7:15 p.m. CST Nov. 9 in Texas Ballroom D-E of the Grand Hyatt San Antonio.

The 5th annual AACR Distinguished Lectureship on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities, funded by Susan G. Komen, recognizes an investigator whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the etiology, detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of cancer health disparities.

“I’m humbled and honored by this recognition. However, I am actually accepting this on behalf of all of the amazing scientists, patients, and medical professionals that have contributed to any work that might be deemed mine,” Dr. Carpten said. “I’ve been blessed to work with some of the most outstanding scientists in the world and this award is as much theirs as it is mine. I hope to continue to pursue the purpose that’s been given me to help understand and ultimately improve health outcomes for all people, particularly the underrepresented.”

Dr. Carpten has made a number of seminal discoveries in cancer genetics and genomics. His work has applied high-throughput genomic technologies to discover important genomic alterations in cancer. In addition, he has a strong passion and commitment to understanding cancer etiology among minority populations, which is evident through his leadership role in the African-American Hereditary Prostate Cancer (AAHPC) Study Network. This network was conceived by Dr. Carpten and has become a model for genetic linkage studies in underrepresented populations and was the first to conduct a genomewide scan for prostate cancer susceptibility genes in African-Americans.

In addition, his work on multiple myeloma has led to a better biological understanding of the differences in incidence and outcomes seen among African-American patients with multiple myeloma. More recently, his group has discovered a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which confer increased risk of developing prostate cancer. He has recently led and co-authored a series of articles describing the roles of genetic variants in prostate cancer risk in Genome Research, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Carpten is an active member of the AACR. He is currently a senior editor of Cancer Research, and has previously served as a member of the Minorities in Cancer Research (MICR) Council Committee, chair of the 2010 MICR Scientific Symposium, member of the MICR-Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship Committee, member of the Research Grant Review Committee, and as a member of the editorial board of Clinical Cancer Research.

Prior to joining TGen, Dr. Carpten was an investigator with the cancer genetics branch of the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute. He received his doctoral degree in molecular genetics from The Ohio State University in Columbus.

About the American Association for Cancer Research
Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 35,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in 97 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 20 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with over 18,000 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes eight peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients, and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the Scientific Partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of team science and individual grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer. For more information about the AACR, visit www.AACR.org. Follow us: Cancer Research Catalyst http://blog.aacr.org; Twitter @AACR; and Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/aacr.org

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

Ivy Foundation Funds Society of St. Vincent de Paul Diabetes Program

Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2013 3:45 am

http://bit.ly/1gQaibq

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation (Ivy Foundation) announced its funding of the Family Wellness Program managed by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Phoenix.

The Ivy Foundation is the largest privately funded brain cancer research foundation in North America; Catherine Ivy is the founder and president of the Ivy Foundation.

The Family Wellness Program is a culturally responsive diabetes intervention program that provides education, lifestyle improvement skills, medical, and counseling services to adults, children, and their families who have been diagnosed with diabetes and pre-diabetes and its associated comorbidities (two or more medical conditions present simultaneously in a patient).

The overall goal is to empower these families with the knowledge, tools and skills to make health a priority throughout their lives.

Ivy Foundation Inspires a New Generation of Leaders

IVY FOUNDATION RENEWS SUPPORT FOR TGEN PROGRAM

Posted on May 8, 2013 by News Release

Bioscience helix

The Arizona-based Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation will fund a second year of the Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The internship program offers hands-on biomedical research experience for high school, undergraduate and aspiring medical school students pursuing careers in brain tumor research, neuroscience and neurogenomics.

Through the program, world-class scientific investigators at TGen guide interns in the translational process of moving laboratory discoveries along the pipeline into new treatments for patients in clinical trials.

“Based upon the success of the 2012 pilot year, we believe the Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program at TGen will inspire a new generation of leaders in this field,” said Catherine Ivy, President of The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation. “There is an urgent and continuing need to encourage research into the intricate workings of brain cancer.”

TGen will select seven students for the program this year. Starting in June, two high-school students will participate in a 10-week summer program. Four undergraduate students will spend the fall semester at TGen, and one student planning to attend medical school will participate for a full academic year, beginning in the fall.

“Development of a local, knowledge-based workforce depends on educating and training talented students in the latest aspects of biomedical research and medicine,” said TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent. “The continued support from the Ivy program greatly enhances our efforts to provide hands-on experience in the area of translational research.”

In addition to brain tumor and neurological sciences research experience, Ivy interns will participate in a clinical training module that will engage them with the ultimate focus of these studies – the patient.

“TGen recognizes that we must invest in the development of the next generation of researchers and physicians; we need to prepare today’s students for the complex and challenging work awaiting them in the areas of brain tumor and neurological sciences research,” said Brandy Wells, Manager of TGen’s Education and Outreach.

http://aznow.biz/health-care/ivy-foundation-renews-support-tgen-program

Join on March 20th and Help Support Nonprofits

What if Arizona became the most generous state in the nation for one day — raising millions of dollars for the benefit of their communities? It is possible.

Join on March 20, 2013 for Arizona Gives Day.

Learn more at azgives.org! And stay tuned for updates…