Ben Ivy

Ben Ivy - The Ivy Foundation

Before losing his battle with brain cancer in 2005, Ben Ivy lived his life to the fullest.

Read more about the man who inspires The Ivy Foundation: http://www.ivyfoundation.org/about-us/who-was-ben-ivy/

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Who Was Ben Ivy?

Benjamin (Ben) Franklin Ivy III graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree from Cornell University and received his MBA from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was President of Ivy Financial Enterprises, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisory firm in Palo Alto, California. Ben was a Certified Financial Planner and a Registered Principal of Associated Securities Corp. who specialized in investment real estate. He was a pioneer in the concept of comprehensive financial and estate planning through a very successful series of lectures and workshops.

Ben possessed great intellect and had the ability to communicate his thoughts and ideas to his clients. He was listed annually in “Who’s Who in America” for over 20 years. In November of 2005, Ben lost his battle with brain cancer. He had survived only four months after diagnosis. Ben set a true example of living life to the fullest. He is missed and continues to set an example for those who were fortunate enough to have known him. The Ivy Foundation was created by Ben and his wife, Catherine, in order to support medical research.

Learn more about the Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation here.

Diamondbacks Pitcher Supports his Best Friend Diagnosed with Brain Cancer

With his best friend set to undergo surgery for a highly aggressive form of brain cancer, Diamondbacks pitcher Wade Miley was hoping and praying for a sign, some kind of indication that Johnnie Santangelo III was going to be all right.

This was early Tuesday morning. Santangelo was leaving Miley’s house for Barrow Neurological Institute. Miley told him he loved him, and on Santangelo’s way out the door Miley’s dog followed.

“You know how it is early in the morning; I didn’t really wake up good,” Miley said. “I remember him, in a daze I remember him looking back and saying, ‘Don’t worry, Sassy, I’m going to be back to see you.’ That just made me feel good. That comforted me. Him telling the dog that. That’s what stuck with me.”

A day after surgery, things are looking up. Doctors say they have removed the glioblastoma multiforme tumor, and concerns that existed pre-surgery about motor functions or vision problems have been mitigated. They think Santangelo is going to be OK.

“I’ve never been so happy in my life,” Miley said.

It has been a harrowing couple of weeks.

Santangelo and Miley have been best friends since childhood. Santangelo always went by “Little Man,” and it just happened he grew to 6 feet 5. Growing up in Louisiana, the two would hunt, fish, play sports and raise hell.

“Whatever you could think of that kids from the country would do,” Miley said. “There wasn’t a day that went by that we weren’t getting in trouble.”

Most recently, Santangelo, who was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 2004 but never pitched professionally due to elbow problems, had been running his family’s mushroom farm in Louisiana. But then came the headaches. Bad ones.

“They checked out his nose, checked out his ears and sinuses and all that stuff,” Miley said. “One day his vision got all messed up. They called his dad. His dad thought he was (joking). They took him to the hospital and told him he had a brain tumor. Probably some of the worst news you could ever get.”

Miley heard the news about a half hour before the buses left Salt River Fields for the team’s trip to Australia, and the day after they returned Miley flew to Louisiana. He was worried about how his friend would look, but what he saw was the same old Johnnie. This gave Miley hope.

Every doctor Santangelo visited told him the same thing: the cancer was inoperable. They recommended a laser treatment. Miley mentioned it to Diamondbacks trainer Ken Crenshaw, and a few phone calls led them to Barrow’s Dr. Nader Sanai, who thought surgery was possible. They were told doctors would see him as soon as he could get to Arizona.

And so until Tuesday, Santangelo and his family had been staying at Miley’s house. He went to the hospital early that morning. Miley joined them later and stayed as long as he could, but he was scheduled to face the Giants that day and headed out in the middle of the afternoon.

There was concern about Santangelo not being able to move the left side of his body, but he put those to rest once he came to after surgery, picking up his left leg and fist-pumping.

“I let him squeeze my hand (Wednesday) with his left hand and he almost broke it,” Miley said.

Santangelo is having trouble focusing with his eyes heavily dilated, but doctors don’t think it will last. He watched Miley’s outing from the hospital on Tuesday night with one eye, cursing when Miley hung a slider that Brandon Belt crushed for a three-run homer in the first inning. But Miley settled down, got through seven innings and the Diamondbacks won, and after the game Miley delivered two game balls to his friend.

“He had both of them in his hands, juggling and messing with them,” Miley said. “It meant a lot when I handed those to him.”

Santangelo also gave Miley a hard time for not giving him a shoutout in his postgame interviews.

“He’s a big hunter, so he was like, ‘Get my name out there, I might get a hunting trip out of it,’ ” Miley said.

Miley said Santangelo, who has a 4-inch scar on the back of his head, will probably head home to heal and rest before coming back to start radiation and chemo.

“He’s doing about the best I can imagine,” Miley said. “I was scared to death about what I was going to see. He’s as good as he can be. He’s not out of the woods, but he’s a whole hell of a lot better than he was doing three days ago when that tumor was still in there.”

Link to the story on azcentral.com

 

Such a Beautiful Story

200 Friends Throw Early Prom to Surprise Teen Diagnosed with Brain Cancer

By KELLI BENDER

200 Friends Surprise Teen Diagnosed with Brain Cancer with Early Prom

Cancer has taken a toll on Amber Martin, but the teen’s friends made sure it didn’t take away her prom.

Martin had been looking forward to the cherished high school event since she met her boyfriend Austin Hunt in the summer of 2013. The 16-year-old even moved from her home in Lancaster, Penn., to attend high school with Hunt in Kansasa, Okla., according to Lancaster Online.

Shortly after the move and six years after Martin’s first bout with cancer, the teen’s astrocytoma, a type of brain cancer, came out of remission. The discovery rattled Martin’s new life, especially after losing her father to cancer three years earlier. She returned home for treatment and gave up on the prom she’d been anticipating for months.

“Amber wanted to attend the prom with her new boyfriend, Austin, but unfortunately, her cancer is terminal, so that’s not possible,” said her mother, Angela Hurst, to Lancaster Online. “So we made her wish known to some friends. We were hoping to do this very small and intimate, but with everyone getting involved and the donations we’ve gotten, it has turned into the night of her dreams.”

The initially small group of prom planners grew into a 200 person party committee dedicated to giving this cancer-stricken high schooler her simple wish.

Read more: http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20782901,00.html

Community Support is Everything

Outpouring of support for young W.Va. man battling brain cancer

Elaine Blaisdell

OAKLAND — The outpouring of emotional and monetary support from the community for 20-year-old Dylan Jones, who has been battling stage 4 glioblastoma brain cancer, has been tremendous, according to his mother Erika Graham of Oakland.

“I have been floored by the response from the community,” Graham said. “The support from Garrett County alone has been tremendous, every business has posted signs asking for prayer for him. I’ve been amazed by the support of the community, it has been really great. People all over the United States have said they are praying.”

Jones, described by others as a guy who would do anything for anybody, was diagnosed with glioblastoma in December 2012. He underwent surgery at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va., a year ago, then underwent chemotherapy and radiation at Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

While receiving treatment at Duke, Jones’ insurance coverage was exhausted and costs weren’t covered, Graham said. In October, Jones was doing great and there was no sign of the cancer, according to his mother, but around Thanksgiving he started feeling tingling and numbness on his right side. Following an MRI, it was confirmed that the brain tumor had returned and that cancer cells had spread to other areas of the brain.

“The doctors decided to change his chemotherapy and medicine to try to shrink the tumor but his body didn’t respond to any of the treatments,” said Graham. “He got home last Tuesday and we decided we have exhausted all treatment options. We are now doing alternative treatments now. We are praying and hoping for the best.”

Numerous fundraisers have been held in both Oakland and Keyser, W.Va., to help with medical expenses. Money from fundraisers currently being held will go toward the holistic treatments Jones is undergoing. Insurance doesn’t cover the costs of the alternative treatments, which cost $2,800 a month, Graham said.

“It is so very important that he doesn’t miss any dosages so we have to make sure we always have the money on hand to order what we need when we need it,” wrote Graham on the Dylan Jones Cancer Support Group Facebook page. “He is also on a very strict diet so we can only feed him organic fruits and vegetables.”

The biggest fundraiser thus far has been Dollars for Dylan, which is set up at the Wepco Federal Credit Union in Oakland. GiveForward, another fundraiser, has raised $2,915.

On the GiveForward blog, Graham said she is not giving up and asks people to do the same.

“Even though our hearts are crushed we are not giving up,” wrote Graham. “The pain I’m feeling right now as my heart aches for my son is unbearable but I’m determined not to lose hope. I don’t know what God’s plan is here but I sure hope it’s to prove he can make miracles happen.”

Jones and the news of his fight against brain cancer has gone viral on social media, so much so that #DylanJonesFight started trending on Twitter, according to Graham. Celebrities like country music singer Wynonna Judd and Duck Dynasty have retweeted #DylanJonesFight and country music artist Colt Ford has stated on Twitter that he is praying for Jones.

Other fundraisers include Thirty One, Pampered Chef, hoagie, T-shirt and window sticker sales, as well as cash bash and band benefits. A campaign on Booster.com that is selling T-shirts has garnered $490.

Basketball players from Union, Keyser and Frankfort high schools recently wore gray, which is the color for brain cancer awareness, during their respective games in support of Jones.

The Kenny Jones Band of Keyser played at Schmitt’s Saloon in Morgantown earlier this month and raised $247 for Jones, according to their Facebook page. The band has been holding various fundraisers for Jones throughout the year.

Upcoming fundraisers include a bake sale at 7-Eleven in Oakland Saturday starting at 8 a.m. and band benefit on Feb. 8 at the Black Bear Tavern and Restaurant in McHenry from 7 p.m. until closing. The Dylan Jones Cancer Fund Facebook page, which has 3,260 members thus far, has updates on additional upcoming fundraisers.

Jones is a 2011 graduate of Union High School and following graduation he worked on his grandfather, Roy Jones’ farm in Elk Garden, according to Graham.

Jones is the son of Craig Jones of Mount Storm, the stepson of Jeremy Graham of Oakland, the brother of Brianna and Wesley Jones both of Mount Storm, the great grandson of floyd “Buck” Jones of Elk Garden, the grandson of Roy and Priscilla Jones of Elk Garden and Ramona and James Hanlin of Mount Storm.

Anyone wishing to send cards or donate may send them to the The Dylan Jones Cancer Fund, 3976 Mayhew Inn Road, Oakland MD, 21550. Donations can also be made on the GiveForward website at https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/4yk3/dylan-jones-cancer-fund  

Source: http://www.times-news.com/local/x1724065386/Outpouring-of-support-for-young-Oakland-man-battling-brain-cancer

A Former Teacher with Brain Cancer Talks Priorities

After A Cancer Diagnosis, Lessons In Priorities

Teaching high school English came naturally to David Menasche but a terminal brain cancer diagnosis forced him to leave the classroom. So he visited some of his former students to see what impact he’s had on them. He writes about the experience in his forthcoming book, The Priority List

TRANSCRIPT

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I’m Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Christmas is here and later in the program, we have a special gift for you. Some of our favorite conversations of the year from translating hip-hop lyrics into sign language, to a legendary musician turning personal grief into powerful song. First, though, a teacher who’s inspiring his students less with his lesson plans and more with his life.

David Menasche taught English in a Miami high school for years. But as he approached the final stages of terminal brain cancer, Menasche decided it was time to hit the road. He spent more than a hundred days traveling hundreds of miles by train and car visiting some of his former students. And he wrote about the journey in a upcoming book called, “The Priority List: A Teacher’s Final Quest to Discover Life’s Greatest Lessons.” And he joins me now. David, welcome to the program.

DAVID MENASCHE: Thank you, Celeste.

HEADLEE: It wasn’t after you got diagnosed that you decided to go on this trip. What’s shocked me a bit was that it was after you’d actually lost a large…

MENASCHE: Exactly.

HEADLEE: …Portion of your vision when it would be the hardest – the most difficult, it seems to be, to go traveling. Why then?

MENASCHE: Well, it wasn’t the diagnosis of brain cancer that got me motivated to go on the trip. It was actually this past July 10, 2012, I suffered a stroke that took away the left side of my body and half of my vision. And at that point, I realized I couldn’t teach anymore, as I couldn’t drive. I couldn’t even get to work, much less watch a over a class of 30 students. So bored, frustrated and feeling purposeless, I decided to take a trip to go visit my former students. So I put a post on Facebook, and within 48 hours, I had offers in 50 different cities, which led to a trip of over 8,000 miles, 75 different students and different couches, over 101 days, and as you said, a book.

HEADLEE: So did you basically decide to visit each student that invited you on Facebook? Or did you…

MENASCHE: Yes.

HEADLEE: …Pick and choose?

MENASCHE: No, my intention was to go see every single one of them, but unfortunately, because of circumstances – you know, kids get sick, people get pulled out of town, things like that happen – I didn’t get to see every single one of the students that I had got an offer from. But I did get the lion’s share of it. Making it all the way to the Pacific Ocean for the first time for me.

HEADLEE: So the question you were asking these students was what kind of impact did I have on your life, right?

MENASCHE: I wanted to know if I made a difference.

HEADLEE: Do you think you were able to get an honest answer from them? I mean, I would imagine that with you sitting right in front of them…

MENASCHE: Absolutely. I had quite a few students tell me, oh, I hated your class. You put me on the spot all of the time. I never felt prepared. But, you know, at the same time, I would ask them, did that in any way help you? And very frequently the answer would be yes.

You know, that being forced to think on their feet, being forced to answer questions ultimately was a benefit. But no, not all of them were, you know, just fawning over me, which was good because that’s what I wanted was an honest answer. But for the most part, I got a range within each one of them where they would say, this part of the class was amazing. This other part of the class, I could’ve done without.

Read more: http://www.npr.org/2013/12/25/256874611/sorting-priorities-after-a-cancer-diagnosis