Derrick Hall of the Arizona Diamondbacks is Honorary Chair of TGen’s 9th Annual StepNout Race Nov. 2

5K is expected to draw more than 1,000 participants to the Scottsdale Sports Complex, helping fund TGen’s pancreatic cancer research

Arizona Diamondbacks President and CEO Derrick Hall for the first time is the honorary chair of the 2014 stepNout Run Walk Dash, funding pancreatic cancer research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The 9th annual stepNout has a new location: the Scottsdale Sports Complex, northeast of Bell and Hayden roads. More participants are expected this year than ever before.

More than 1,000 people are expected to participate Nov. 2 in stepNout, which features fun, competitive races for all ages and abilities, including the event’s signature 5K run. Participants may register at the event. More information is available at www.tgenfoundation.org/step.

“Unfortunately, I lost my father to pancreatic cancer about three years ago,” Hall said. “It’s a terrible disease, and it’s usually not detected until it is in an advanced stage. By that point, there are few options. TGen is working on a method of early detection for pancreatic cancer, which this year will take the lives of nearly 40,000 Americans, the nation’s fourth-leading cause of cancer-related death.”

Erin Massey, Vice President of Development for Cancer Programs at the TGen Foundation, said: “Having an event chair like Derrick, who has been personally impacted by this disease, and who also understands TGen’s mission, provides an immediate connection to patients, their families and the thousands of concerned members of our community.”

TGen’s pancreatic cancer research is led by Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, TGen’s Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, and Chief Scientific Officer for the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, a partnership with TGen. Dr. Von Hoff is one of the world’s leading authorities on pancreatic cancer.

“If anyone is going to make a difference in treating this disease, and perhaps one day finding a cure, it is Dr. Daniel Von Hoff,” said Hall, who also is a member of TGen’s National Advisory Council for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

Vowing to “fight pancreatic cancer, one step at a time,” stepNout aims to surpass the $1 million mark in fundraising. Participants have donated more than $750,000 since the event started in 2006 at Kiwanis Park in Tempe.

Mattress Firm, the nation’s leading bedding retailer, announced in August that it had agreed to be the presenting sponsor of stepNout.

If you go to stepNout
What: TGen’s 9th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research.
Where: Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, northeast of Hayden and Bell roads, between Loop 101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.
When: 7-11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2.  Registration starts at 7 a.m.; races begin at 9 a.m.; an awards ceremony is set for 10 a.m.; and a kids’ dash is planned for 10:30 a.m.
Cost: Registration fees range from $15 to $35, depending on age and competition. Children ages 4 and under are free.
Registration: Register at the event.
Parking: Free.
More information: www.tgenfoundation.org/step.

About Mattress Firm
With more than 1,500 company-operated and franchised stores across 36 states, Mattress Firm (NASDAQ:MFRM) has the largest geographic footprint in the United States among multi-brand mattress retailers. Founded in 1986, Houston-based Mattress Firm is the nation’s leading bedding retailer with more than $1.2 billion in sales for 2013. The company offers a broad selection of both traditional and specialty mattresses, bedding accessories and other related products from leading manufacturers, including Sealy, Tempur-Pedic, Serta, Simmons, Stearns & Foster, Hampton & Rhodes and Atmos. Mattress Firm guarantees price, comfort and service with the ultimate goal of ensuring customers Save Money. Sleep Happy™. More information is available at mattressfirm.com.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

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TGen Receives Approval for Patient Enrollment in Brain Cancer Clinical Trial

Catherine Ivy and Dr. David Craig

 

Glioblastoma (GBM) Pilot Trial funded by Ivy Foundation

In 2012, The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation awarded $10 million in grants for two groundbreaking brain cancer research projects at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). One of those projects has officially received the final regulatory approval from University of California, San Francisco, which means patient enrollment for the trial can begin.

 

In the $5-million-project, “Genomics Enabled Medicine in Glioblastoma Trial,” TGen and its clinical partners will lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies that will test promising new drugs that might extend the survival of GBM patients. This multi-part study will take place in clinics across the country and TGen laboratories.

 

“GBM is one of the top three fastest-killing cancers out there and it affects people of all ages,” said Catherine (Bracken) Ivy, founder and president of The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation. “It is critical that we fund research that will help patients live longer so we can study and treat brain cancer.”

 

The project begins with a pilot study of 15 patients, using whole genome sequencing to study their tumor samples to help physicians determine what drugs might be most beneficial.

 

To support molecularly informed clinical decisions, TGen labs also will examine genomic data from at least 536 past cases of glioblastoma, as well as tumor samples from new cases, developing tools that will produce more insight into how glioblastoma tumors grow and survive. TGen also will conduct a series of pioneering lab tests to measure cell-by-cell responses to various drugs.

 

“GBM is a disease that needs answers now, and we strongly believe those answers will be found in the genome,” said Dr. David Craig, TGen’s Deputy Director of Bioinformatics, Director of TGen’s Neurogenomics Division, and one of the projects principal investigators. “Identifying the genes that contribute to the survival of glioblastoma will provide valuable information on how to treat it, and may also lead to an improved understanding of what drives other cancers as well.”

 

To get new treatments to patients as quickly as possible, this five-year study will include a feasibility study involving up to 30 patients, followed by Phase II clinical trials with as many as 70 patients. TGen is teaming with the Ivy Early Phase Clinical Trials Consortium that includes: University of California, San Francisco; University of California, Los Angeles; the MD Anderson Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; University of Utah; and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

 

The results of these clinical trials should not only help the patients who join them, but also provide the data needed for FDA approval and availability of new drugs that could benefit tens of thousands of brain cancer patients in the future.

 

“Working with physicians, the project will aim to understand treatment in the context of the tumor’s molecular profile. We will have the opportunity to determine when combinations of drugs might be more effective than using a single drug, quickly identify which therapies don’t work, and accelerate discovery of ones that might prove promising for future development,” said Dr. John Carpten, TGen’s Deputy Director of Basic Science, Director of TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, and another of the project’s principal investigators.

 

In addition to helping patients as quickly as possible, the project should significantly expand Arizona’s network of brain cancer experts.

 

About The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation, based in Scottsdale, Ariz., was formed in 2005, when Ben Ivy lost his battle with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).  Since then, the Foundation has contributed more than $50 million to research in gliomas within the United States and Canada, with the goal of better diagnostics and treatments that offer long-term survival and a high quality of life for patients with brain tumors.  The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation is the largest privately funded foundation of its kind in the United States.  For more information, visit http://www.ivyfoundation.org. We have regular updates via social media – please find us on:

Blog:  Ivy Foundation http://www.IvyFoundation.wordpress.com

Facebook:  Ivy Foundation  http://www.facebook.com/IvyFoundation

Twitter:  @IvyFoundation https://twitter.com/IvyFoundation

Google+:   Ivy Foundation https://plus.google.com/105982076267406579679/posts

LinkedIn:  Ivy Foundation http://linkedin.com/company/the-ben-and-catherine-ivy-foundation

YouTube:  IvyFoundationGBM http://www.youtube.com/user/IvyFoundationGBM

 

About TGen

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. Research at TGen is focused on helping patients with diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes. TGen is on the cutting edge of translational research where investigators are able to unravel the genetic components of common and complex diseases. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities, TGen believes it can make a substantial contribution to the efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk

LAUNCHES INAUGURAL 5K RUN & WALK EVENT TO RECOGNIZE ALL CLINICAL TRIAL VOLUNTEERS

Partnership with DIA to Honor People Who Give the Gift of Participation in Clinical Research

BOSTON, MA – March 1, 2014 — The Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP), an independent non-profit, is excited to announce the launch of a new event — Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk in San Diego — to celebrate the volunteers who give the gift of participation in clinical research. The first annual Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K Run & Walk will coincide with the Drug Information Association (DIA) 2014 Annual Meeting. The event will take place on Monday, June 16, 2014 outside the San Diego Convention Center from 6:45-8:00am. Participants are encouraged to register early as space is limited. To register, visit ciscrp.org/med-hero-5k.

“Medical Heroes are the millions of people who help advance public health and medical knowledge by taking part in clinical trials each year,” said CISCRP’s founder, Ken Getz. “This special event recognizes their gift, raises public awareness and appreciation, and hopefully will become an annual tradition.”

Running and walking enthusiasts and all supporters of CISCRP’s mission are invited to participate or attend the event to show their support. Proceeds from the event will support education and outreach programs to patients and families interested in learning more about the clinical research process.

“We are honored the inaugural offering of the Medical Heroes Appreciation 5K will be held during the 50th Anniversary of DIA’s Annual Meeting.” said Lori Risboskin, DIA’s Associate Director Event Planning & Exhibits. “DIA members understand the importance of clinical research volunteers and appreciate their participation in clinical trials. We’re delighted to help CISCRP launch this special event.”

Registrants will have the opportunity to check-in early on Sunday June 15, 2014 from 8am – 9am, 12pm – 1pm, and 3pm – 6pm to receive event materials and giveaways. Regular check-in the day of the event begins at 6am; and the 5K Run & Walk will begin at 6:45am. For more information about the event, to volunteer, register or become a sponsor, visit ciscrp.org/med-hero-5k. Questions about event registration should go to Ellyn Getz (617) 725-2750, e-mail medhero5k@ciscrp.org, or call toll free 1-877-MED-HERO.

About CISCRP

CISCRP is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to engaging the public and patients as partners in the clinical research process. CISCRP provides free education and outreach to the general public and patient communities. Visit www.CISCRP.org for more information or to support CISCRP.

About the DIA 2014 50th Annual Meeting

The DIA Annual Meeting is the premier event for professionals involved in the discovery, development and lifecycle management of pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices and related medical products. No other industry event rivals the depth and breadth of experience that this meeting delivers through 20 interest-area tracks, 260+ program offerings and 18 pre-conference tutorials. The presentations are geared to attendees of all disciplines and experience levels. Visit our website at www.diahome.org and follow DIA at: LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, and Pinterest.

https://www.ciscrp.org/programs-events/events/annual-medical-heroes-appreciation-5k/

 

 

Who Was Ben Ivy?

Benjamin (Ben) Franklin Ivy III graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree from Cornell University and received his MBA from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was President of Ivy Financial Enterprises, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisory firm in Palo Alto, California. Ben was a Certified Financial Planner and a Registered Principal of Associated Securities Corp. who specialized in investment real estate. He was a pioneer in the concept of comprehensive financial and estate planning through a very successful series of lectures and workshops.

Ben possessed great intellect and had the ability to communicate his thoughts and ideas to his clients. He was listed annually in “Who’s Who in America” for over 20 years. In November of 2005, Ben lost his battle with brain cancer. He had survived only four months after diagnosis. Ben set a true example of living life to the fullest. He is missed and continues to set an example for those who were fortunate enough to have known him. The Ivy Foundation was created by Ben and his wife, Catherine, in order to support medical research.

Learn more about the Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation here.

Community Support is Everything

Outpouring of support for young W.Va. man battling brain cancer

Elaine Blaisdell

OAKLAND — The outpouring of emotional and monetary support from the community for 20-year-old Dylan Jones, who has been battling stage 4 glioblastoma brain cancer, has been tremendous, according to his mother Erika Graham of Oakland.

“I have been floored by the response from the community,” Graham said. “The support from Garrett County alone has been tremendous, every business has posted signs asking for prayer for him. I’ve been amazed by the support of the community, it has been really great. People all over the United States have said they are praying.”

Jones, described by others as a guy who would do anything for anybody, was diagnosed with glioblastoma in December 2012. He underwent surgery at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va., a year ago, then underwent chemotherapy and radiation at Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

While receiving treatment at Duke, Jones’ insurance coverage was exhausted and costs weren’t covered, Graham said. In October, Jones was doing great and there was no sign of the cancer, according to his mother, but around Thanksgiving he started feeling tingling and numbness on his right side. Following an MRI, it was confirmed that the brain tumor had returned and that cancer cells had spread to other areas of the brain.

“The doctors decided to change his chemotherapy and medicine to try to shrink the tumor but his body didn’t respond to any of the treatments,” said Graham. “He got home last Tuesday and we decided we have exhausted all treatment options. We are now doing alternative treatments now. We are praying and hoping for the best.”

Numerous fundraisers have been held in both Oakland and Keyser, W.Va., to help with medical expenses. Money from fundraisers currently being held will go toward the holistic treatments Jones is undergoing. Insurance doesn’t cover the costs of the alternative treatments, which cost $2,800 a month, Graham said.

“It is so very important that he doesn’t miss any dosages so we have to make sure we always have the money on hand to order what we need when we need it,” wrote Graham on the Dylan Jones Cancer Support Group Facebook page. “He is also on a very strict diet so we can only feed him organic fruits and vegetables.”

The biggest fundraiser thus far has been Dollars for Dylan, which is set up at the Wepco Federal Credit Union in Oakland. GiveForward, another fundraiser, has raised $2,915.

On the GiveForward blog, Graham said she is not giving up and asks people to do the same.

“Even though our hearts are crushed we are not giving up,” wrote Graham. “The pain I’m feeling right now as my heart aches for my son is unbearable but I’m determined not to lose hope. I don’t know what God’s plan is here but I sure hope it’s to prove he can make miracles happen.”

Jones and the news of his fight against brain cancer has gone viral on social media, so much so that #DylanJonesFight started trending on Twitter, according to Graham. Celebrities like country music singer Wynonna Judd and Duck Dynasty have retweeted #DylanJonesFight and country music artist Colt Ford has stated on Twitter that he is praying for Jones.

Other fundraisers include Thirty One, Pampered Chef, hoagie, T-shirt and window sticker sales, as well as cash bash and band benefits. A campaign on Booster.com that is selling T-shirts has garnered $490.

Basketball players from Union, Keyser and Frankfort high schools recently wore gray, which is the color for brain cancer awareness, during their respective games in support of Jones.

The Kenny Jones Band of Keyser played at Schmitt’s Saloon in Morgantown earlier this month and raised $247 for Jones, according to their Facebook page. The band has been holding various fundraisers for Jones throughout the year.

Upcoming fundraisers include a bake sale at 7-Eleven in Oakland Saturday starting at 8 a.m. and band benefit on Feb. 8 at the Black Bear Tavern and Restaurant in McHenry from 7 p.m. until closing. The Dylan Jones Cancer Fund Facebook page, which has 3,260 members thus far, has updates on additional upcoming fundraisers.

Jones is a 2011 graduate of Union High School and following graduation he worked on his grandfather, Roy Jones’ farm in Elk Garden, according to Graham.

Jones is the son of Craig Jones of Mount Storm, the stepson of Jeremy Graham of Oakland, the brother of Brianna and Wesley Jones both of Mount Storm, the great grandson of floyd “Buck” Jones of Elk Garden, the grandson of Roy and Priscilla Jones of Elk Garden and Ramona and James Hanlin of Mount Storm.

Anyone wishing to send cards or donate may send them to the The Dylan Jones Cancer Fund, 3976 Mayhew Inn Road, Oakland MD, 21550. Donations can also be made on the GiveForward website at https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/4yk3/dylan-jones-cancer-fund  

Source: http://www.times-news.com/local/x1724065386/Outpouring-of-support-for-young-Oakland-man-battling-brain-cancer

A Woman’s Final Months Told Through Twitter

The Incredible Story Of A Woman’s Final Months Fighting Brain Cancer As Told Through Her Tweets

Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/the-incredible-story-of-a-womans-final-months-fighting-brain

Inspiration Spotlight: Liz Salmi

Operation life

Liz Salmi is just a gal living in Sacramento, who likes to hang out with her husband and loves her job in communications. After she was diagnosed with brain cancer five years ago, however, Salmi began using her blog, The Liz Army (www.thelizarmy.com), to keep loved ones in the loop on her cancer status. Now, Salmi reaches thousands with the site, using posts to advocate for the National Brain Tumor Society. Salmi sat down with SN&R to talk about blogging, her advocacy work, living with brain cancer and, really, just living.

When were you diagnosed with brain cancer?Liz Salmi

July 2008. I had just turned 29. My first symptom was a really big seizure. So, that’s how I found out, from a seizure.

So, where are you now?

I’m done with treatment. Where I’m at is there’s still cancerous tissue in there. I’ve had two surgeries to try to get rid of as much of it as possible right away, and then I was put on an oral chemotherapy pill. I have been off that pill for two years, and I get scans … every four months to watch the brain. It’s still there, it’s just kind of frozen, deer-in-the-headlights style. [When the] tumor is still there, as long as it doesn’t change, you’re good.

When did you start using your blog specifically for cancer updates?

Well, when you have a crazy disease, everyone wants to know what’s going on, and I let everyone know I had a brain tumor, and I was going to have brain surgery. I got my cellphone, which they shouldn’t have given me, and I created a text message, like, “I have a brain tumor. I’m going to have brain surgery in three days.” I copied everyone in my phone, and I sent it. I was out of it, so my boyfriend at the time started emailing everyone updates, and I thought, “You know, rather than emailing everyone updates, I should just open up the blog and let them follow along that way.”

What has the response been?

I’m getting about 12,000 to 13,000 unique visitors every year. It’s not just people with brain cancer. It’s their loved [ones]. It seems like your friend gets diagnosed, and you want to talk to them every day, but you know they’re busy, so you’re trying to find out what’s this like, and so you read this stuff, and [they realize], “Oh, so that’s what they’re going through.” It’s not exactly the same, but then, people feel like they can understand what their friend is going through.

How has social media helped you in your recovery in living with your disease?

The blog is a conduit for me to find other people like me. I am able to develop an online network of people who know what it’s like. We don’t all have the same type of tumor, we don’t all have the same symptoms, we might not all have the same treatment, but we all experience the same fear or guilt. So, there’s no way I can walk out on the street and meet that person, but through social media and this online world, I am able to make those connections.

What is the worst thing anyone has said to you about your diagnosis?

I was on the phone with my sister … about a month-and-a-half after the diagnosis, and she was just like, “I don’t know how to react. I’m really scared. It seems like everyone’s getting cancer. First it was you, now my dog has cancer.” I was like, “Can you really compare the two?” I don’t think she realized, but I was just like, wow.

Best thing anyone’s said?

Having a blog and writing about all my experiences, I get lots of feedback through the comments section, and then there’s Twitter and there’s Facebook. Even just the first time hearing that I wrote something and it’s exactly how someone else feels—one, I don’t feel alone, and two, [it feels] cool that someone else felt like I said what they feel.

You’re also an advocate for the National Brain Tumor Society.

I am an unpaid volunteer, but I am the lead advocate for the state of California—which is a huge state. I’m like, “Can there be more of us?” There’s just a couple of national brain-tumor organizations. [The National Brain Tumor Society] is the biggest one, and they deal mainly with advocacy.

Greatest ambition?

Right now, I’m living, and I think a lot about [that] I have this disease, and I’m going to accomplish this. I would love to get out of that one day and live like a normal person and not think about accomplishments and checking things off related to my disease. I don’t know if I’ll be able to get there, but that would be cool.

http://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/operation-life/content?oid=10929156

TGen President Speaks at Brookings Institution Biomedical Conference

TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent speaks at Brookings Institution biomedical conference

Dr. Trent presents TGen’s precision medicine research at the world’s most influential think tank

Dr Jeffrey Trent Outside TGen

TGen President and Research Director Dr. Jeffrey Trent speaks at Brookings Institution

WASHINGTON, D.C. – July 15, 2013 – Dr. Jeffrey Trent, President and Research Director for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), will discuss state-of-the-art genomics research July 16 at the Brookings Institution.

Dr. Trent, Ph.D., F.A.C.M.G., and former Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, is part of a panel, Innovation in Action, at Brookings’ 2nd annual State of Biomedical Innovation Conference, which will focus on the use of novel data sources to improve medical product development and care delivery.

Specifically, Dr. Trent will discuss TGen’s ongoing work in translating genomics research into clinical benefit. TGen is one of a very few centers who are using the entire human genome in clinical trials in order to diagnose or make treatment decisions for an individual patient (precision medicine).

“The human genome will be the medical textbook for the next century and beyond,” Dr. Trent said. “By harnessing the power of the human genome, we will provide immeasurable patient benefit while at the same time reducing the time and costs of diagnosis and treatment. TGen is a global leader in clinical trials that deploy this form of innovative research.”

TGen’s translational model enables pioneering discoveries in the laboratory to be quickly moved to clinical trials where they can be used to immediately benefit patients with many types of cancer and other debilitating diseases.

Dr. Trent’s panel will be moderated by Dr. Mark B. McClellan, Director and Fellow of Brookings’ Initiative on Innovation and Value in Health Care. He is the former administrator for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (2004-2006), and the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (2002-2004). He also served as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and as senior director for health care policy at the White House (2001-2002). In these positions, he developed and implemented major reforms in health policy.

This conference is being convened by the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at Brookings, which was established to help turn ideas for health care reform into action, including reducing gaps in insurance coverage and ensuring health care affordability. Its mission is to develop data-driven, practical policy solutions that promote broad access to high-quality, affordable and innovative care in the United States. The Center also conducts research, makes policy recommendations, and facilitates development of new consensus around key issues, providing technical support to implement and evaluate new solutions in collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders.

The conference is scheduled for 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EDT July 16 at the Brookings Institution, Falk Auditorium, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.  Dr. Trent’s hour-long panel is scheduled to start at 10:10 a.m.  The event will be streamed live on the Brookings website: http://www.brookings.edu/events/2013/07/16-biomedical-innovation.

About the Brookings Institution
The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, DC. Our mission is to conduct high-quality, independent research and, based on that research, to provide innovative, practical recommendations that advance three broad goals: strengthen American democracy; foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans; and secure a more open, safe, prosperous and cooperative international system. Brookings is proud to be consistently ranked as the most influential, most quoted and most trusted think tank. More information: www.brookings.edu.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

https://www.tgen.org/news/2013-media-releases/tgen-president-dr-jeffrey-trent-speaks-at-brookings-institution.aspx#.UflE6I3a8vz