Ivy Foundation Expands Internship Program at TGen

Big News!

             We have expanded our Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program through the Translational Geonomics Research Institute (TGen). This opportunity is known as the premier neuro-related biomedical internship in the state as it offers hands-on biomedical research experience for high school, undergraduate and medical school students. TGen investigators mentor interns interested in the fields of brain tumor research, neuroscience and neurogenomics. They educate the interns about the translational process of moving laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients in clinical trials. “The Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program at TGen has the capacity to inspire a new generation of scientists with the skills needed to pursue the complexities of studying the human brain,” said our president, Catherine Ivy. “As advancements are made in this field, it is ever more important to help guide the next generation of talented individuals who can elevate the research to new levels of discovery – ultimately, the discovery of cures for cancers and neurological disease.”

            Beginning this summer, high-school students will participate in a ten-week program and undergraduates will be able to intern for a full academic year. Additionally, medical students, who are deferring a year of school for research training, will work full-time at TGen. Before now, undergraduates could only intern for one semester and medical students only worked part-time. Our contribution extends the mentoring time available to students in order for them to further develop their bioscience skills under the guidance of the world-class scientific investigators at TGen. “The changes to this year’s Ivy program greatly enhance our efforts to provide hands-on experience for students in the fundamentals of translational research,” said TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent. “Through Catherine’s vision and support we are developing a local, highly skilled workforce that will continue to push the boundaries of biomedical research.”

          In addition to brain tumor and neurological sciences laboratory research, Ivy interns gain experience through exposure to clinic life through training, seminars and clinical site tours. The clinical training module will engage them with the ultimate focus of TGen’s investigations — the patients. “Today’s students must be prepared for the rigors of some of the world’s most complex studies in the areas of brain tumor research and neurological sciences,” said Brandy Wells, Manager of TGen’s Education and Outreach program. “The Ivy program provides students with a great preview of what their careers in biomedical research will encompass.”

For more information, please contact Brandy Wells at bwells@tgen.org or 602-343-8655

catherine-ivy-with-tgen-scientists-final

About The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation, based in Scottsdale, Ariz., was formed in 2005, when Ben Ivy lost his battle with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).  Since then, the Foundation has contributed more than $50 million to research in gliomas within the United States and Canada, with the goal of better diagnostics and treatments that offer long-term survival and a high quality of life for patients with brain tumors.  The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation is the largest privately funded foundation of its kind in the United States.  For more information, visit www.ivyfoundation.org.  Connect with The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation on Facebook at www.facebook.com/IvyFoundation and on Twitter @IvyFoundation.

About TGen

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

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Internships in Neurology at TGen

AZ Red Book

http://www.azredbook.com/wellness.php?id=644&cat=26

The Arizona-based Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation will fund a $45,000 pilot internship program this summer and fall at the Translational Genomics Research Foundation (TGen).

The Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation and TGen developed the Ivy Neurological Sciences Internship Program to inspire high-school and undergraduate college students to pursue careers in bioscience, particularly in the areas of brain tumor research and neuroscience.

The program will provide hands-on biomedical research under the mentorship of TGen investigators.

“Mentor-intern relationships play a pivotal role in developing and driving a student’s career choice,” said Catherine Ivy, president of the Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation. “It is my hope that the Ivy Neurological Sciences Internship Program will inspire additional research into the neurosciences and that these students will become the next generation of leaders in the field.”

TGen will select five students for the pilot program, which starts in June. Three high-school students will participate in a 10-week summer program, and two undergraduate students will be selected for extended 20-week internships that will continue into the fall, enabling a more in-depth research experience.

TGen understands that the development of a local, knowledge-based workforce depends on educating and training talented students today.

“To fully achieve our mission, we must make a significant investment in our area schools and local communities,” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen president. “The Ivy Program provides the access to help educate students on the impact genomics has on their lives in terms of a career in the biomedical sciences.”

By design, the program immerses interns in the translational process, which marries the discovery process with clinical care to more rapidly transform research into new treatments for patients.

“Students in the program gain a greater understanding of the connection between laboratory research results and their application toward patient care. In doing so, they view firsthand the continuum from the lab bench to the patient bedside and clinical implementation,” said Dr. Candice Nulsen, director of TGen’s Office of Science Education and Outreach.

Additional components of the internship program include medical rounds, drug development, lectures and opportunities for students to present their scientific findings. For more information, contact Dr. Candice Nulsen, Ph.D., at cnulsen@tgen.org or 602-343-8466.