Saks Fifth Avenue and Saturday Night Live Partner to Celebrate SNL’s 40th season, and the 16th Year of Key to the Cure

Cast members of Saturday Night Live, entering its 40th season this fall, are promoting the 16th year of Saks Fifth Avenue’s “Key to the Cure,” locally benefiting women’s cancer research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

During Key to the Cure‘s Oct. 16-19 charity-shopping weekend, Saks Fifth Avenue at Biltmore Fashion Park, 2446 E. Camelback Road, will donate 2 percent of sales to support breast and ovarian cancer research at TGen.

The highpoint of the Saks Phoenix fundraising shopping spree is the signature Key to the Cure fashion show, starting at 8:30 a.m. Oct. 17, featuring gourmet food, drinks, a raffle for designer items, and an exclusive peak at the latest fashions. For more information, please visit: www.tgenfoundation.org/events, or contact Andrea Kobielski at akobielski@tgen.org or 602-343-8572.

“We are honored to be Saks’ long-term partner for Key to the Cure, and excited about the visibility and awareness that Saturday Night Live’s past and current cast members bring to women’s cancers,” said Erin Massey, Vice President of Development for Cancer Programs for the TGen Foundation. “Locally, Key to the Cure highlights TGen’s patient-focused breast and ovarian cancer research initiatives and provides our scientists funding to pursue new and innovative research.”

Current Saturday Night Live cast members (Vanessa Bayer, Cecily Strong and Colin Jost) and past cast members (Will Ferrell and Ana Gasteyer) are this year’s Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF) ambassadors for Saks Fifth Avenue’s 2014 Key to the Cure campaign.

The SNL cast members will appear in national public service announcements wearing a limited-edition unisex tee created by celebrated New York designers Marcus Wainwright and David Neville of rag & bone. The Key to the Cure PSA will appear in major fashion and lifestyle magazines in September and October.

The shirt will retail for $35 at Saks Fifth Avenue stores and online at saks.com and saksoff5th.com. All — 100 percent — of the proceeds from each shirt sold will be donated to TGen, benefiting charitable programs dedicated to finding new detection methods, better treatments and eventual cures for women’s cancers. The tee debuts Oct. 1 at Saks Fifth Avenue.

In the past 15 years since the inception of the Saks Fifth Avenue charity-shopping weekend, the retailer has raised more than $35 million for cancer research.

In addition to the partnership for the annual Key to the Cure campaign, Saks Fifth Avenue will sell exclusive merchandise inspired by notable Saturday Night Live characters from seven New York designers. These items, curated by Saturday Night Live’s Emmy-nominated costume designer Tom Broecker, will be available in Saks Fifth Avenue’s New York flagship store and on saks.com during the Key to the Cure shopping weekend.

The merchandise includes: Mango’s shorts as interpreted by Alexander Wang, The Nerds outfit as interpreted by Alice + Olivia, a dress fit for The Californians as interpreted by Diane von Furstenberg, Spartans Cheerleading uniforms as interpreted by Elizabeth and James, hats fit for The Coneheads as interpreted by Eugenia Kim, Mary Katherine Gallagher’s school uniform as interpreted by rag & bone, and Gilly’s dress as interpreted by Suno.

About Saks Fifth Avenue
Saks Fifth Avenue, one of the world’s pre-eminent specialty retailers, is renowned for its superlative American and international designer collections, its expertly edited assortment of handbags, shoes, jewelry, cosmetics and gifts, and the first-rate fashion expertise and exemplary client service of its Associates. As part of the Hudson’s Bay Company brand portfolio, Saks operates 39 full-line stores in 22 states, five international licensed stores, 73 Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH stores and saks.com, the company’s online store. Saks Fifth Avenue is proud to be named a J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Customer Service Champion and is only one of 50 U.S. companies so named.

About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

Who Was Ben Ivy?

Benjamin (Ben) Franklin Ivy III graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree from Cornell University and received his MBA from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was President of Ivy Financial Enterprises, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisory firm in Palo Alto, California. Ben was a Certified Financial Planner and a Registered Principal of Associated Securities Corp. who specialized in investment real estate. He was a pioneer in the concept of comprehensive financial and estate planning through a very successful series of lectures and workshops.

Ben possessed great intellect and had the ability to communicate his thoughts and ideas to his clients. He was listed annually in “Who’s Who in America” for over 20 years. In November of 2005, Ben lost his battle with brain cancer. He had survived only four months after diagnosis. Ben set a true example of living life to the fullest. He is missed and continues to set an example for those who were fortunate enough to have known him. The Ivy Foundation was created by Ben and his wife, Catherine, in order to support medical research.

Learn more about the Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation here.

Cancer and Courage

Teen’s generous spirit lives on through brain donation

A guitar signed by U2 is now on permanent display at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Ann Arbor in honor of 15-year-old Laurence Carolin, who had a rare brain cancer. He donated his brain for research.

A guitar signed by U2 is now on permanent display at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor in honor of 15-year-old Laurence Carolin, who had a rare brain cancer. He donated his brain for research. / KATHLEEN GALLIGAN/Detroit Free Press
Laurence Carolin died in 2010.

Laurence Carolin died in 2010.
Neuro-oncologist Patricia Robertson and Lisa Carolin, Laurence Carolin's mother, take in the U2-signed guitar. Carolin said her son "asked himself what he was going to do to make a difference and thought about organ donation." Laurence had hoped to meet U2, but when that wasn't possible, he asked the Make-A-Wish Foundation to donate $5,000 to the United Nations Foundation.

Neuro-oncologist Patricia Robertson and Lisa Carolin, Laurence Carolin’s mother, take in the U2-signed guitar. Carolin said her son “asked himself what he was going to do to make a difference and thought about organ donation.” Laurence had hoped to meet U2, but when that wasn’t possible, he asked the Make-A-Wish Foundation to donate $5,000 to the United Nations Foundation. / KATHLEEN GALLIGAN/Detroit Free Press

Laurence Carolin always knew he wanted to help people — whether raising money to feed the hungry or to buy mosquito nets to combat malaria in Africa.

So when the 15-year-old from Scio Township found out he was terminally ill with brain cancer, he wanted to make sure his life made a difference.

Laurence, who died in January 2010, decided to donate his brain to the University of Michigan in hopes of helping others who suffer from the rare disease.

On Wednesday, a Gibson Les Paul guitar signed by the band U2 was unveiled on the third floor of C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor to honor Laurence — the first youth to donate his or her brain to the university’s research program.

“He asked himself what he was going to do to make a difference and thought about organ donation,” said Lisa Carolin, Laurence’s mother.

When Laurence found out he couldn’t donate his organs to other patients, he asked his mom whether the university could use them for research.

“He drew up the paperwork, and we both signed it,” Carolin said. “I was really proud and excited, and I thought it was brilliant because people can make so much of a difference with their bodies.”

Laurence’s journey wasn’t easy, his mother said.

Before his diagnosis, he experienced extreme depression and had suicidal thoughts, Carolin said.

“He was always exuberant, happy and outgoing,” Carolin said. “For two weeks, he had extreme depression and physical symptoms, including balance issues.”

He learned he had a rare form of brain cancer — glioblastoma multiforme — soon after seeing doctors in December 2007, Carolin said.

The experience, she said, was bittersweet.

“He was smiling and said, ‘I know what’s wrong with me,’ ” Carolin said. “I don’t think he looked at it as a terminal diagnosis.”

Laurence began raising money to fight global poverty shortly afterward.

He hoped to meet U2 through the Make-A-Wish Foundation but found out he couldn’t.

Instead, Laurence had the foundation make a $5,000 donation to the United Nations Foundation, which works with U2’s charitable organization, One.

The nonprofit group does not accept donations directly, Carolin said.

“He could have used the money solely for his gratification,” said Dr. Hugh Garton, a pediatric neurosurgeon at Mott. “But he wanted to raise community awareness.”

Laurence donated another $30,000 as part of his own fund-raising campaign.

“He was always of that mind-set,” Carolin said about her son’s desire to help others.

The band learned about Laurence’s efforts and signed his guitar after a concert in fall 2009 at Soldier Field in Chicago. It will remain on permanent display at Mott.

In addition, Laurence’s legacy continues at Dexter High School through a student branch of the One organization.

Students create posters and sell bracelets to raise awareness for poverty, malaria and HIV and AIDS in Africa.

Each year, students from Mill Creek Middle School in Dexter, where Laurence attended, also participate in an essay contest in hopes of winning a $500 scholarship that can be used to donate to charity, for college or both.

Contest participants are asked how they would make a difference in the world, and the essay that most represents Laurence is chosen.

Besides raising money for charity, Laurence, who was adopted from South Korea, also celebrated Airplane Day — known as the day an adopted child from overseas flies home with his or her new parent.

The day is celebrated like a birthday. For the last few years, Laurence’s family and friends have used the day to raise awareness for his causes.

Next year, the event will be held Feb. 2 at the Foggy Bottom Coffee House in Dexter.

“Laurence had the most amazing sense of humor through the whole thing, when it’s so easy to get sad,” said Donna Turner, a family friend.

“He taught me that bad things can happen every day, but you can choose if can’t overcome them or if you can overcome them and make a difference.”

Contact Melanie Scott Dorse

 

http://www.freep.com/article/20121220/NEWS05/312200222/Teen-s-generous-spirit-lives-on-through-brain-donation

Woman Creates a Whimsical Tribute for Her Mother

Woman, 36, who lost mother to brain cancer creates breathtaking fantasy land photo series in her memory

  • Kirsty Mitchell’s Wonderland series has been three years in the making
  • All costumes, wigs and sets were constructed on a shoestring budget
  • Some images took up to five months to create
  • She would often wait an entire year to find the perfect natural setting for her shots

By STEPHANIE HIRSCHMILLER

PUBLISHED: 09:11 EST, 17 May 2012 | UPDATED: 04:34 EST, 18 May 2012

Kirsty Mitchell’s late mother Maureen was an English teacher who spent her life inspiring generations of children with imaginative stories and plays. Following Maureen’s death from a brain tumour in 2008, Kirsty channelled her grief into her passion for photography.

She retreated behind the lens of her camera and created Wonderland, an ethereal fantasy world. The photographic series began as a small summer project but grew into an inspirational creative journey.

‘Real life became a difficult place to deal with, and I found myself retreating further into an alternative existence through the portal of my camera,’ said the artist.

Kirsty Mitchell has dedicated her Wonderland photographic series to the memory of her late mother, Maureen, who lost her life to a brain tumour in 2008 Kirsty Mitchell has dedicated her Wonderland photographic series to the memory of her late mother, Maureen, who lost her life to a brain tumour in 2008

‘This escapism grew into the concept of creating an unexplained storybook without words, dedicated to her [my mother], that would echo the fragments of the fairytales she read to me constantly as a child.’

Kirsty, 36, who has a background in fashion and costume design, collaborated with hair and make-up artist Elbie Van Eeden.

Both were in full time jobs so they spent evenings and weekends creating props, wigs, and sets on a shoestring budget and shot in the woodlands surrounding Kirsty’s home in Surrey.

Kirsty developed a deep bond and respect for the locations in which she was working and strove, through her pictures, to ‘remind others of their forgotten magic and beauty’.

She became fascinated with pockets of wild flowers such as the bluebells that would appear for only a few brief weeks of the year. In some cases, she would wait a full 12 months so she could shoot costumes matched to the vivid colours of nature.

‘All the characters came to me in my dreams,’ she explained, but she delighted in the chance to step into the scenes for real: ‘after all, it’s not often you get to stand beside an eight foot princess in the rain, or witness the dawn with a dancing circus girl on stilts!’

The resulting images looked so hyper-real that it was assumed that they were created in Photoshop. Many people believed the photographs were shot all around the world, when in reality they were taken in locations within short drives of her Surrey home.

So Kirsty began to write diary accounts and blog behind-the-scenes shots about the creation of each photograph. ‘My aim was to portray time passing, an unsaid journey through four seasons, incorporating every colour in the rainbow.

As things progressed, her costumes became more elaborate with the props and new characters often taking up to five months to create. ‘The project blossomed into our own private playground,’ she said.

Her three year labour of love is now almost complete and there are plans for an exhibition and accompanying book: ‘I just know that the day I see my mother’s name printed on the inside cover of the Wonderland book, it will feel like I have finally fulfilled my promise to myself and her precious memory.’

Danaus: A close-up of a model before a sunlit backdrop, peering through a veil of paper butterfliesDanaus: A close-up of a model before a sunlit backdrop, peering through a veil of paper butterflies
While Nightingales Wept: a model captured running though the woods near Kirsty's homeWhile Nightingales Wept: a model captured running though the woods near Kirsty’s home in Surrey
A Floral Birth: Kirsty imagines a creature begotten from natureA Floral Birth: Kirsty imagines a creature begotten from nature
Lady of The Lake: a model emerges from a pool of lilies amidst the forestLady of The Lake: A model emerges from a pool of lilies deep within the forest
Far, Far Away: A twenties style circus performer swings from a giant treeFar, Far Away: A twenties style circus performer swings from a giant tree
Gammelyn's Daughter. the model clutches a ship to her chest amidst a heathery cushionGammelyn’s Daughter: The model clutches a ship to her chest atop a heathery cushion
The White Queen: ruling over the forest of Wonderland
The Fall of Gammelyn: a decaying forest king

The White Queen ruling over the forest of Wonderland and The Fall of Gammelyn, a decaying forest king

The Storyteller: a reference to Kirsten's mother, a model on a carpet of bluebells enveloped by booksThe Storyteller: A reference to Kirsten’s English teacher mother, a model sits elegantly on a carpet of bluebells enveloped by books
The Queen's Armada: A fantasy queen sales a fleet of the most delicate paper ships The Queen’s Armada: A fantasy queen sails a fleet of the most delicate paper ships
The Beautiful Blindness of Devotion: eyes closed in prayer
The Briar Rose: a human rambling rose

The Beautiful Blindness of Devotion sees a painted girl with eyes closed in prayer while The Briar Rose is a human rambling rose appearing to grow from the stonework

The Faraway Tree: ethereal ships, magically lit, appear to sprout from this tree as commanded by the queenThe Faraway Tree: ethereal ships, magically lit, appear to sprout from this tree as if commanded by the queen
Dryad: a nymph clings to giant tree roots suspended over the river Dryad: A nymph clings to giant tree roots suspended over the river
Euphaeidae: a winged fairy princess amidst a sea of lavender Euphaeidae: A winged fairy princess amid a sea of lavender
Spirited Away: blooms stand out against a snowy forest backdrop - a promise of the spring to comeSpirited Away: Blooms stand out against a snowy forest backdrop – a promise of the spring to come

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2145760/Wonderland-Kirsty-Mitchell-heart-breakingly-beautiful-photographic-series-memory-extraordinary-life.html#ixzz284KjQnrv